Radius (2017)

Radius (2017)

Radius

Director: Caroline Lebrèche & Steeve Léonard

Cast: Diego Klattenhoff, Charlotte Sullivan, Brett Donahue

Liam wakes from a car crash with no memory of who he is. As he makes his way into town to look for help, he finds only dead bodies, all with strange pale eyes. Liam’s first assessment is that a virus is present in the air, but he soon discovers the horrible truth: anyone who comes within a 50-foot radius of him dies instantly. – IMDB

Car crashes and memory losses are a common occurrence in film. Radius however takes a different approach by adding extra element to the familiar, an unknown danger. From that point on, Radius sets up a thriller that starts off in its opening scene setting up the mysterious and suspenseful scenario and following through with a tense and well-paced thriller to the finish. There are only a few key characters and while the foundation of the movie sometimes falls into a familiar formula, the radius of death for Liam and his reliance on this unknown girl who is the only one mysteriously immune to it is what keeps the audience on their toes. There is a danger here and yet, the characters don’t seem to deserve any of it because they are hurt and confused.

Radius

The cast mainly revolves around the two main characters. The first is a man we soon learn to be Liam. He is portrayed by Diego Klattenhoff who pulls off a strong performance. A lot of the opening scenes are solo and quiet moments and he manages to show the confusion and desperation as he realizes fairly early in the film that he has this mysterious danger to others. As the first act wraps up, Liam has learned his name and meets this other girl who also lost her memory and doesn’t remember her name so is referred to as Jane (short for Jane Doe), who is played by Charlotte Sullivan. Her role here is also done well as she seems even more of a blank slate than Liam and because of that, she is more suspicious of the situation and this man who initially hides information from her. Their bond is one that is intriguing to watch evolve as their journey to follow each  memory that flashes by them to uncover what actually happened takes us through the course of the film up until the big reveal. Other than this bond, these characters constantly remind us of their innocence in this situation and the despair makes them the victims. With no apparent villain other than their predicament, the audience can bond with these two characters.

 

Radius

Radius is a well-paced thriller. It creates a balance of mystery and humanity. Its story has the elements that raises it above the cliched initial scenario, setting it apart in a unique way. The dangers of being able to kill with proximity alienates these two characters, making their bond more intriguing to watch develop. Radius does an intriguing set up in its first act and a tense fast-paced second act but slightly stumbles in its third act during its ramp to the final reveal. Despite its small stumbles, the third act is still shocking. Radius relies on the audiences bond with the characters. The bottomline is that Radius is a competent thriller that does well with great pacing and good characters.

Radius is an official selection for FrightFest, Fantastic Fest and Fantasia Film Festival. It is available on VOD on November 10, 2017.

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Double Feature: The Precipice Game (2016) & The Loft (2014)

And we are back to regular programming!

I have a few outstanding movies to review. Lets just hope I still remember them enough to write about them. First up is a double for two thriller-esque movies, a Chinese thriller set on a cruise ship The Precipice Game and a thriller with some well-known actors that I like called The Loft.

Lets check it out!

The Precipice Game (2016)

precipice game

Director: Zao Wang

Cast: Ruby Lin, Peter Ho, Mr. Black, Scar Kim, Wang Ji, Li Lin, Li Shangyi, Gai Yuexi

Liu Chenchen, a free-spirited young woman, rebels against her wealthy family and elopes with her boyfriend to join a cruise-bond treasure hunt. But what began as an innocent game with promises of great reward soon turns into a battle for survival when the contestants are thrown into a mysterious world of intrigue and chaos in the middle of the sea.-IMDB

The Precipice Game can really only be categorized as a thriller because of its twisty ending which while doesn’t seem to hint at it too much, you start somewhat suspecting the possibility of it all no matter how extremely ridiculous it seems. Now may be a good time to emphasize for those unfamiliar that the term Chinese films differ from Hong Kong films and I make that difference not because I particularly emphasize on my love for Hong Kong but because the film industry was established and progressed differently before the handover in 1997 and the themes and styles still differ immensely. It also goes to say that I’m still fairly new to the Chinese movies that are not from Hong Kong and therefore am frequently unfamiliar with the cast, this movie being somewhat of an exception because the actor and actress here is the reason I even gave The Precipice Game a chance.

the precipice game

The Precipice Game isn’t  all bad. They draw inspiration on different Hollywood films perhaps and while it all seems ambitious, it does try the best to get the tone down. The Precipice Game also has a decent cast however, suffers from having too many characters and really giving time for 2 or 3 characters to have the spotlight. Adding on the fact that some do overact a little on a film that is really quite serious makes it all the more frustrating to watch. There are scenes that will remind you of Saw a little (without the extreme body horror) and it gets the whole playing the game thing going on. Perhaps its strength is the cruise ship setting, giving it the tight corridors and similar paths easily making it claustrophobic and hard to maneuver.

The Precipice Game didn’t give me any thrills but the I did like some of the characters and wished they had more time to drive the suspense than  just keep a death tally on people that we didn’t particularly care about. It may be the bitterness I have after watching Saw and being fed up of the “lets play a game” except these people were dumb enough to join into a vague game to win a big prize but my common sense took over where if I saw it was a weird host and an empty cruise ship, my danger receptors would sound off and I would choose to just leave. However, I am aware that people, especially in movies, make a lot of dumb choices.

Fairly average and quite predictable, even its decent cast couldn’t quite save it. It does have a twist ending so maybe you want to see this to see if you can figure it out.

The Loft (2014)

the loft

Director: Erik Van Looy

Cast: Karl Urban, James Marsden, Wentworth Miller, Eric Stonestreet, Matthias Schoenaerts, Isabel Lucas, Rachael Taylor

Five married guys conspire to secretly share a penthouse loft in the city–a place where they can carry out hidden affairs and indulge in their deepest fantasies. But the fantasy becomes a nightmare when they discover the dead body of an unknown woman in the loft, and they realize one of the group must be involved. – IMDB

I wanted to like The Loft so much. I’m not a fan of the premise to begin with. I mean, married men who believe they need a place to have their affairs. Suffice to say, The Loft should have been a character study of these different men. However, the cast here is amazing. If we didn’t have this cast, I might have turned off the movie and never finished it. Really what falls apart is the story and the dialogue. It seems this was a remake of a European thriller and I’ll probably try to hunt that one down one day since I do think there’s something interesting here.

the loft

There isn’t much to say about this one. I’m fairly indifferent to it. There are some pacing issues and it tries to mesh the investigation afterwards with what happened and then doing flashback and current and the story does seem to jump around quite a bit. To be fair, some of the characters here aren’t really bad in nature however, this is one of those stories where you don’t really want to cheer for anyone but its really wondering who did it, who is lying and what secrets do they have all hidden away.

The Loft didn’t offer any thrills. It never hit the erotic part of what it seemed to want to do either and then it never has compelling enough characters and dialogue to keep it suspenseful. Its fall short in so many ways that its quite below average. 

This wraps up the lackluster thriller double feature of The Loft and The Precipice Game.
Both have things they do right and they have the potential to be good but for various reasons, it just falls flat making them both average and  forgettable.

Have you seen these two? 

TV Binge: Close Your Eyes Before It’s Dark (2014)

**I’m currently in a work deadline rush due on Halloween. The horror of it all! Sorry for skipping on the posts. The intention was there to write. I just couldn’t find a moment. So here is yesterday’s post and if by any luck things go well today at work *fingers crossed* I will have two posts for tomorrow, one review and one special Halloween post that I always do every year for wrap-up. **

With all that out of the way, I am yet again changing directions on the horror marathon and chose quite the rare appearance in Taiwanesw series which is set with a horror background with something of a And Then There Were None vibe called Close Your Eyes Before It’s Dark.

Lets check it out!

Close Your Eyes Before It’s Dark

close your eyes before it's dark

Cast: Man-shu Jian, Bryan Shu-Hao Chang, Allen Chen, Blue Lan, Yen Tsao, Chun-Haw Hsu, Ke-Fang Sun, Sheng-Ping Chu, Tammy Darshana Lai, Shang-Ho Huang, Di-Yang Huang

While vacationing at a mountain cabin, a group of longtime friends uncover an old scandal that could have deadly consequences.-IMDB

Where to even start with this one? Lets just get this fact out of the way in case anyone here is a Taiwan movie/TV series connoisseurs: I don’t know watch as many of Taiwanese productions as I’d like and if you have any of these Taiwanese horror/thriller genre movies or TV series, please go ahead and recommend them to me. With that said, Close Your Eyes (as I will call the series from now on) is pretty refreshing to see. Just like TW series won’t work for everyone, the same applies here. There are some odd choices they make here and to me are missteps however, they have a whole different that they overall nail and for the most part, it actually feels more like a thriller with horror elements which isn’t a bad thing because that is one of my favorite movie genres/subgenres (not sure which its considered). Thrillers are hard to get down good especially with trying to instill ineasiness in its audience and lets just say, not everyone can be Pretty Little Liars. I draw this comparison because when the show started it, these young actresses were quite fresh faces just as the cast in Close Your Eyes are. The story does take the stance of backflashing to the last time they were camping at this cabin before the group had a fallout. Part of it is looking at what broke them apart and also what keeps them together as friends in both the past and present and gives it something of a parallel.

Whats works here:

  • The atmosphere: Close Your Eyes is set in the rather cliche stranded in a country cabin and the storm had blocked the road and knocked out the only cell/telephone line so no communication outside and can’t go out either as they are also located on a mountain. However, the proper use of this and its sounds and knowing when to just let silence and subtlety take its place is done well enough here to get its audience a little tense. The lighting and such are also done pretty well here to give it some creepy vibes here and there. Its a little cliche at times but it still works alright. However, for hardcore horror fans, this one might still be lackluster.
  • Opening & Ending Theme: It sounds really stupid to talk about the themes but the way they play with the sounds actually makes the subtle soundtrack as the ending theme so effectively creepy! The opening does a really cool creepy sequence which shows the tone of the show and where its headed.
  • Suspense: I have to be on record to be a little hesitant on using this as it works for the most part.  A lot of the reveals and twists work relatively well however, there are some parts where it hints a little too much to lose its suspense. However, it does well to keep the audience suspicious.

Close Your Eyes

What  doesn’t work so much:

  • Acting: There really is only one thing that took me out from the show a lot of times and that was the acting. Some of the actors here and the expressions they made were really hilarious and overexaggerated. It felt like they were trying to portray something but the plot never gave their character the plot that justified it. I’ve explained before that unlike American television, Taiwan/Hong Kong/Chinese/Korean/Japanese series are all done in self-contained series so when a season is done then the story is wrapped up. If there were to be a sequel, then they’ll take another story arc. However, this one, there are a lot of characters and some of the characters don’t seem to get the depth they deserve, making them mean less and in a show like this, you need to be able to cheer on the characters and want them to survive. However, some of these ones here are a little lacklusters. One of the characters that show up later on are actually the worst. I actually laughed at some of his expressions really hard and that really took me out of the immersion as that was nearing the ending episode where the whole thing would reveal itself. I have to make the exception that the older actress here who plays Fang, the mountain cabin owner is a more seasoned actress and does pretty good.
  • Voice-overs: The worst part of the show and some of the most head-scratching moments as to why they chose to do this is give voice-overs to the corpses. The corpses would have conversations and sometimes it would be little hints and clues however, it was these brief moments that made the show feel nonsensical. I didn’t see the purpose of it and would have rather that they didn’t. Think of The Autopsy of Jane Doe (although I won’t or I’ll get nightmares) but non-talking corpses wins the creepy factor any day.

Close Your Eyes is not too bad. It had its good and bad elements. Like I said before, its more of a thriller more than anything. It tries to get in a few twists and for the most part, succeeds even in its cliched moments. You can see the effort was made to get the atmosphere and the tone down while trying to highlight the significant relationships here. However, it does need a little work to piece the clues a little better although it did surprise me a few times, so I’m pretty pleased with that also and gave me a few creeps. If you like a quick Taiwanese series and explore what could hopefully be a first step into some more horror Taiwanese series, this is pretty decent. I was expecting it to be much worse. The surprise has to do with why I think its alright and probably worth a watch if you are into some suspense and mystery along with some light creepy setting.

Horror Marathon: Gerald’s Game (2017)

Let’s take a break from straight up horror and go for something a little more psychological. Gerald’s Game was recently released as a Netflix Originals and is directed by Mike Flanagan who I overall love quite a bit. His latest movies have been good and not great, however, I always wonder how you can rival a great debut like Absentia. However, I do think he has a great vision on building horror and always remain hopeful when it comes to creating the tense atmosphere. With some expectation and little knowledge of what Gerald’s Game is about, I went to check it out!

Gerald’s Game (2017)

gerald's game

Director: Mike Flanagan

Cast: Carla Gugino, Bruce Greenwood, Henry Thomas, Chiara Aurelia, Carel Struycken, Kate Siegel

While trying to spice up their marriage in their remote lake house, Jessie must fight to survive when her husband dies unexpectedly, leaving her handcuffed to their bed frame.-IMDB

Stephen King’s novels have been adapted since forever. This year, it seems to be all over the place with IT recently released in theatres and then there’s been TV shows as well. Now, we land on Gerald’s Game. For those new here, I’m a reader but sadly, I’ve been incredibly behind on reading Stephen King novels. I’ve only read two novellas, A Good Marriage and 1922 and a novel, Carrie. I’m currently reading IT and that’s proving to be an endless task. However, I have watched a lot of adaptations of his. I can say that he has great art in creating incredible characters and developments and such and even the mystery, thriller, suspense, horror atmosphere balance. However, be it The Mist or IT, I can’t quite buy into their endings. Suffice to say that I didn’t know anything about Gerald’s Game before jumping into this one. When the movie started and even into the 2nd part of it, I was a fan. It was captivating and thrilling to watching our main character try to figure out a way to survive and have her inner monologue and even hallucinating a second version of herself (like her conscience or something) and her dead husband. However, the story does start to become slightly flat as we near the ending.

gerald's game

Gerald’s Game is a great psychological thriller. There are some gruesome imagery here but overall, its a gripping experience as this wife, Jessie struggles to get herself out of these chains before she dehydrates and dies as no one is expected to be in the neighborhood for the next few days. In many ways, it is very much a thriller with perhaps some horror elements which I found were possibly the weaker parts of the film. The tension built in the conversations and the ideas she got to sustain herself was incredibly engaging to watch. Mike Flanagan is great at creating atmosphere in his films and he yet again achieves it here. The movie is almost completely lead by Carla Gugino and while I can’t quite pinpoint where I’ve seen her act before (although I’m aware of who she is), she does an outstanding job. She takes on the role of Jessie is such a mesmerizing way that its hard to not want her to escape and be scared or nervous together with her as she tries to do one thing or the next. However predictable some of the outcomes are, her role keeps us intrigued to keep watching. Opposite her is Bruce Greenwood who plays her husband. He isn’t physically alive for very long however, the little hints we get dive into further conversations that she envisions as his ghost somewhat hangs around with her. In some ways, her ghost and his ghost play this angel and demon role and its quite entertaining to watch also.

Gerald's Game

While I can appreciate the fact that the story takes on a tangent of Jessie’s past with her father and it somewhat justifies why she chose her current husband, it drives her to the past where she remembers her time with her father and the things he did. I’ll probably be mentioning something a little more fleshed out on portraying fathers in Stephen King’s stories when I get to the IT reviews. Here Jessie’s father is played by Henry Thomas. Its odd how her family was because it seems that the mother suspects something and yet not really. However the jest of it is the trauma that she’s somehow pushed away about her father. That was a pretty disturbing scene. Somehow, this is where the story seems to derail a little. The best parts of Gerald’s Game is when she has those conversations and in the single setting and not when she hallucinates or sees some weird things or goes into her memories. Something about it seems to be executed not quite as effectively, losing the great tension it had built from the beginning.

Overall, Gerald’s Game is a pretty decent movie. I’m talking about this completely as the movie itself and not as an adaptation since I’ve never read the book. If you have read the book and have seen this, does the movie do the book justice? Carla Gugino alone is worth the watch here. She truly commands this role perfectly. Its an engaging and intriguing watch however, it does lose its footing in the last third or maybe even at somewhere near the halfway point. And then the ending, well… I’m not exactly a fan. But then, I’ve had issues with Stephen King endings before. However, Stephen King builds great, deep and twisted characters that not a lot of other authors have ever been able to do and Gerald’s Game shows that off a whole lot.

Horror Marathon: The Autopsy of Jane Doe (2016)

We have a potentially packed watch list this year so I’m putting in a random film  between the main feature. In fact, I watched The Autopsy of Jane Doe in September however it is still creeping me out till this very moment that I am writing up the review. Did I just spoil my own review? Anyways, if its taken such a long time to write, that’s honestly the reason…

Lets just check it out!

The Autopsy of Jane Doe (2016)

The Autopsy of Jane Doe

Director: André Ovredal

Cast: Brian Cox, Emile Hirsch, Ophelia Lovibond, Michael McElhatton, Olwen Catherine Kelly

A father and son, both coroners, are pulled into a complex mystery while attempting to identify the body of a young woman, who was apparently harboring dark secrets. – IMDB

The Autopsy of Jane Doe isn’t quite categorized as a flat out horror because other than the whole autopsy part, it is really a suspense/mystery thriller with horror elements. However, this indie film fits right into this month because it scared the absolute sh*t out of me. It is tense for a huge part of the film. The film takes its time to really let a still corpse have character. How the heck does someone do that? I have no idea at all but damn, did everything just come together. Sure, there were some parts that were tropes and predictable moments but a well executed psychological thriller will make you think and piece together the clues and stew in those thoughts. There is so much detail and so many great moments.

the autopsy of jane doe

The main story focus on a father and son relationship who both work at the morgue and are responsible for the autopsy. The best part is that the story unfolds as they perform each step into the autopsy. The father is played by Brian Cox and the son by Emile Hirsch. While their personal story has some part in the story, what is refreshing is that the story remembers to focus on the mystery in the forefront making it less about personal drama however the parts of personal drama does shape these characters throughout the story progression. Actually, everything happens does drive these characters to be stronger and for the audience to bond more with them and see the father and son bond as well.

The Autopsy of Jane DoeThe Autopsy of Jane Doe is a rather slow-paced experience however, it works to its advantages because it knows when to use the proper imagery to create the suspense and do its proper reveals. I’m keeping this vague mostly because this movie is one to be experienced on your own. I do think that perhaps the end wasn’t exactly as strong however, it still has a lingering effect. Its one that truly delivers in mystery, suspense and horror and even for myself, lingering fear because the horror elements here are still done so very well. Its a one of a kind psychological thriller/mystery/horror experience that after almost a month still is on my mind.

Sorry for the short write-up. I really don’t want to spoil anything. If you haven’t seen this, you really should! Its an awesome movie experience!

Have you seen The Autopsy of Jane Doe? 

Fantasia Festival 2017: Fashionista (2016)

Fashionista (2016)

fashionista

Director and writer: Simon Rumley

Cast: Amanda Fuller, Ethan Embry, Eric Balfour, Alex Essoe, Jemma Evans, Alexandria DeBerry, Devon Bonnee

A woman who uses clothes as an emotional crutch discovers her life isn’t as ideal as she thought… – IMDB

Consumerism is a thriving issue to look at. The addiction of it all and here lies the centre of what this drama and mystery thriller is all about. As the words opening the movie at Fantasia, Fashionista takes you into a world of addiction, sex and rock and roll. Simon Rumley directs and writes this film in a non-linear fashion and films it mostly in that non-linear way. Experimental and unique and the texture of it all is also incredibly independent. It is one of the reasons that Fantasia Festival is such a wonderful experience as we get to see these special pieces of cinema and dive into worlds and film-making styles that we don’t usually get exposed to. Fashionista’s strength lies in this originality of its non-linear presentation. It makes its audience work hard to piece it all together throughout and draw their own conclusions. The majority of it makes sense and the final act will generally resolve most of your suspicions. It sends a message about consumerism and the addiction of one person possibly in an irrational way. Simon Rumley does a great job and capturing the emotions and making very artistic shots.

Its hard to talk about Fashionista without giving praise to its cast. Amanda Fuller takes on the role of April, a woman who lives a dream owning a vintage clothes shop with her husband, Eric ( played by Ethan Embry). She loves clothes and is addicted to its touch and fabric as we quickly learn. She goes through many outfits throughout the movie, something like over a hundred. Amanda Fuller embodies April very well as she is believable in showing us her addiction and as her life falls apart, the reliance on these superficial things in her life. Her behavior shifts easily with every scene especially as she finds out that her husband is having an affair. None of this is spoilers as the trailer shows it. This hops her into another phase in life which enters rich bad boy Randall (played by Eric Balfour) that takes her for another trip filled with sex. Of course, all this is jumbled as the film presents snippets of Randall in the first act and makes us wonder what his whole deal is. Both Ethan Embry and Eric Balfour play great supporting roles here. Their characters are different and in turn as the story unfolds gives us a different feeling.

However, Fashionista does fall short with a less than engaging first act. It takes a long time and spends a little too much time emphasizing on the marriage breakup. Perhaps it is to make sure we connect with April more to feel her pain and her reliance and release with her clothes as she has almost orgasmic reactions when she is with them. It creates a mesmerizing snapshot however it is done a little too much. Some parts of the slow first act could’ve cut down to make this a more compact experience. Not to mention that the fragments were a little much. While well-timed such as keeping the injection of a mysterious woman played by Alex Essoe delightfully short but enough to make us wonder her connection to the rest of the fragments that doesn’t seem to go together. Fashionista truly picks up as Eric Balfour enters the scene and takes us on another journey, similar but different and possibly a little more thrilling. It teases us with a few events and when the entire piece falls into place, it offers up a lot of tension but leaving space for still some mystery.

The rock and roll part is a cornerstone of Fashionista. Its carefully selected music that transitions from one scene to the next or highlighting a certain event or moment. However, it also is these moments where the music is overpowering. Perhaps it is to make sure it overwhelms to emphasize the emotions and become more involved with the story. Unfortunately, it is one of the situations a few moments in we wished that we were watching this at home and we can turn down the volume or later on, whether the movie would voice its story better and be more thrilling and experience using silence instead.

Fashionista is a unique experience, highlighting an important message about addiction to consumerism. It is worth viewing simply for the fantastic performance from Amanda Fuller and its original concept of non-linear storytelling filmed in a non-linear way. It is a thrilling experience however it falls short due to a slow first act and overwhelming musical moments that took away from the movie more than it added. Less is more comes to mind in terms of that criticism. Fashionista is a worth a watch for all its outstanding elements however, perhaps more suitable as a home experience.

Fantasia Festival 2017: Le Serpent aux Milles Coupures (2017)

Le Serpent aux Milles Coupures (aka Thousand Cuts, 2017)

Director: Eric Valette

Cast: Tomer Sisley, Terence Yin, Pascal Greggory, Stephane Debac, Erika Sainte

Le Serpent aux Mille Coupures, aka The Snake with a Thousand Cuts/ Thousand Cuts, is a French crime thriller that centre around a mysterious killing of three drug traffickers. that happens in the small town farm area. The hitman escapes injured and hides out in a mixed family that is already being bullied by their neighbors very much against their will. As the traffickers’ family sends over their own hitman to hunt down and revenge their death, we see four sides of the story from the cops, the neighbors, the hiding hitman and the hunting hitman. The violence and characters are what truly stands out in this adaptation of the French novel with the same name written by DOA.

Thousand Cuts is a reference on the ruthless killer Tod played by primarily Hong Kong actor, Terence Yin. However, the other characters prove to be equally important. Terence Yin pulls off a rather sadistic killer who speaks in Spanish and English (at times illegible, where we wished the there would be subtitles also). However, a lot of his dialogue helped us understand his origins while his cruel torture and killing methods and the obsession for his knife never quite gets further than being a disturbing aftermath. His character felt like its main purpose was to show the extreme cruel, dark side of being a heartless killer in a rather cliche background sort of way. However, his role helped to give a contrast to Tomer Sisley’s nameless injured hitman who is mostly referred to as The Motorcyclist. A killer who is hunted and perhaps is the most intriguing among the characters because he seems to be capable of emotion and manipulation and yet the question arises at a certain point whether he longs for something more or that he is using the emotions of being human to manipulate. This character is deep and will be the centre of provoking further discussion of this movie. The best parts of the film are actually with The Motorcyclist because he is multi-layered and always seems to have something more to discover and wonder.

As a crime thriller, Thousand Cuts offers a decent amount of thrills whether it is in the visual disturbing images by Tod or even the multi-layered Motorcyclist. However, its hard to imagine that this tale is so much more and yet so many issues are not fleshed out enough. It touches only slightly on the family that The Motorcyclist chooses and their issues dealing with racism from the neighboring farms, emphasizing a small town characteristic, but never deep enough or long enough to feel a purpose to it, except to show that The Motorcyclist’s choice of choosing this family makes him also a bully and a bad man, which has proven that perhaps he really isn’t that bad. The neighborhood in the farm area also is a focus that never seems to matter too much even when the finale seems them converging at the same location for the big finale. The fact is Thousand Cuts feels disjointed in many parts and the majority of the characters never seem to get the depth that they deserve. Visually, Terence Yin pulls off a great villain with his ruthless acts but his acts are only there for shock value and reassurance of  his character rather his reluctant driver becomes the comic relief pulling some dark humor in various spots.

Thousand Cuts has the potential to be something more. However, its slow pace and disjointed storyline lacks a certain depth that helps make it memorable. Terence Yin pulls off some great dialogue and captures his role very well. However, the outstanding performances goes to Tomer Sisley as The Motorcyclist who thrills us by the grey area his character resides in constantly. The final act is definitely the best part of the movie as everything comes together and has some engaging action. Thousand Cuts is put together with good moments but somehow it still falls short of its potential. However, if you can put the story aside, the performances here and the imagery is done very well and the set location is also a great choice and these credits go to the director Eric Valette, which makes this one worth checking out.