Fantasia Festival 2018: Big Brother (World Premiere 2018)

Big Brother (2018)

Big Brother

Director: Ka-Wai Kam

Cast: Donnie Yen, Joe Chen, Yu Kang, Mingji Lou, Fung Woo

Big Brother is an unexpected title in Donnie Yen’s filmography however, also one that he has been wanting to do. It is about education and sending the positive message that everyone can follow their dreams even those left behind and ignored by the very competitive Hong Kong education system. It only takes an honest and passionate educator to go beyond their duties to make sure their students go back on the right path. Playing as Mr. Chen, Yen’s role is one that marries the sparse but exciting action scenes that we have come to expect with a more profound dramatic moments focussing specifically on five of the students considered the losers in the “bad” class. His heartfelt performance has some comedic moments especially in the unorthodox way of teaching which fits incredibly well to this out of the box character.

Big Brother

While there are some cameo and supporting roles with more seasoned actors and actresses especially the Taiwanese actress Joe Chen as one of the teachers and Fung Woo as the ex-principal in an inspiring role as well, the five young actors are all first time actors. This decision is a smart one to keep their stories feel real and genuine.  While some of the stories feel dramatized for the movie, the reality is that in the Hong Kong society, their stories are common: alcoholic dad; Hong Kong born Pakistani origins; daughters feeling less important than sons and the high risk of the triad preying on high school students to get them to do their dirty work. For these young cast, they did a great job at each of their respective roles as they each had their own dreams which broke the barrier of the expectations of where they are from.

Big Brother

A lot of praise does have to go to assistant director turned director Ka-Wai Kam as he steps into the director’s chair a fourth time with this project. It is obvious that he has a lot of experience tucked away with the way he maneuvers his shots to capture the moments. He finds a way to add in the action seamlessly to a more dramatic film while not forgetting the focal point of reflecting how a flawed education system breeds the issues that are occurring and puts its focus on a few members to give these characters their well-deserved development and never making them feel disposable. Not to mention, the scenes itself speak for themselves and how these vibrant characters have connected with its audience.

World premiering at Fantasia Festival a whole two and a half weeks before its release in Hong Kong, Big Brother brings both heartwarming and heartbreaking stories about some very real and human everyday life aspects of the Hong Kong education system, the criticism towards its teachers and the society views of it all.  Add this to your collection of inspirational education movies like Freedom Writers, Big Brother might have some societal barriers to understand some of the finer details but its heart to bring a positive message and highlight the flaws in the current education system is one that needs to be addressed. It takes one person willing to go above and beyond to make a difference. It’s perfectly suitable for Donnie Yen. Big Brother is a positively inspiring movie that manages to tug at your heartstrings and cheer for following your dreams and paying it forward.

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Fantasia Festival 2018: Searching (2018)

Searching (2018)

Searching

Director (co-writer): Aneesh Chaganty

Cast: John Cho, Debra Messing, Joseph Lee, Michelle La, Sara Sohn

After his 16-year-old daughter goes missing, a desperate father breaks into her laptop to look for clues to find her. – IMDB

Whatever your digital footprint is, almost all of us has one. That is central focus on this new subgenre of online found footage films produced (and at times directed) by Timur Bebmambetov now called “screen life”. No one knew this was the grand vision when Unfriended (Reviewhit theatres with mixed reviews but there is no doubt this is a project of Bebmambetov as this year’s Fantasia Festival saw the next three films telling different stories using screen life as its basis: Unfriended: Dark Web, Profile and Searching.

Searching

Searching is a family drama mixed into a thriller. The film starts with the endearing (and of course dated) screen of Windows XP as a new user profile is added for his wife. Through this we see the Kim family grow through the years with key moments of the couple and their hardships and milestones. The main two being the daughter Margot’s (Michelle La) first days of school and mom Pam’s (Sara Sohn) diagnosis and fight with cancer. Eventually, its gets the present with messaging and facetime as dad David (John Cho) messages Margot about her not doing chores. Things take a plunge for the worse when Margot never comes home from her study group but called him three times in the dead of night. Realizing something has gone wrong, he files a missing persons report and Detective Rosemary Vick (Debra Messing) is assigned to his case but his assignment is to try to figure out his daughter’s friends and other contacts to pinpoint where she was last seen. With that, he takes the dive into her laptop and learns that her daughter’s has been hiding a few things from him.

Screen life here is used incredibly well here. The idea of our digital footprint being the source to tracking down anyone and getting hints of their life is an idea that feels real. Searching uses it incredibly well. Right from the blocks of protected emails and trying to set up recovery passwords to the first time discovery of what extends for the clueless parent  navigating outside of Facebook and Instagram, like Tumblr and more. Using these real life applications is the key to making it even more realistic, instead of the fictional ones that we usually see in movies. David is a parent who is stuck in his worst nightmare. After the loss of his wife, he realizes that he has no idea what Margot has been up to. The truths he ends up learning leads him to some clues and some dead ends. It is the way that Searching sets it up that makes it both logical and engaging. It takes no time to be invested in recovering this missing teenage girl and wondering whether she had ran away or something worse had happened.

 

Searching

John Cho takes on this dad role impressively. Searching gives him moments of comedy as his cluelessness for the modern social media makes him do silly things relatable for most of the younger generation to probably what parents would respond. At the same time, while Margot’s story highlights the lack of communication in their relationship and makes us think how much fault each of them have in this matter. Michelle La also takes on the role of Margot in a convincing way especially as she is a good kid going through a hard time.  Debra Messing plays the decorated detective, Rosemary Vick who is assigned to this case and seems set on the fact that Margot has run away but also very human from the standpoint of a mother.

Searching might seem like a straightforward idea but the application of screen life is one of the most outstanding used to date. Different from Unfriended, it takes us for a personal journey through the life of the Kim family and a father and daughter relationship while putting us into the worst nightmare of any parent. What is worse in the end: his lack of knowledge of his daughter or whether she will come home. Both equally important and yet helpless thoughts making the development of David a journey in itself as he tackles the assumptions from the world as the case grows public with each discovery. Being a thriller, it takes an incredible approach to put you at the edge of your seat (and I literally was) and adds in the perfect moments to give some clues one step at a time. Searching is full of twists and turns and drops them in a well-paced manner. Its one that comes highly recommended and the wait for this film isn’t long for wide release. It lands in theatres on August 3rd.

Fantasia Festival 2018: Laplace’s Witch (2018)

Laplace’s Witch (2018)

laplace's witch

Director: Takashi Miike

Cast: Sho Sakurai, Suzu Hirose, Sota Fukushi, Mirai Shida, Hiroshi Tamaki, Lily Franky, Etsushi Toyokawa

An environmental analyst is asked by the police to determine if two deaths by hydrogen sulfide poisoning are an accident – or a murder. But when he meets a young woman at both sites, a scientific mystery begins. – IMDB

Based on the 2015 novel by Keigo Higashino, Laplace’s Witch takes its audience for a fantasy and scientific journey. With Takashi Miike at the helm, the accomplishment from his experience is the beautiful setting and the mood that the entire mood sets. The atmosphere and the shots are done incredibly well. It makes some slick moments that create the tension needed for the mystery. The rural Japan setting works great and many of the other backdrops used work beautifully to elevate the scenes even more. As with most Japanese movies, the humor they execute is still very familiar here with some comedic breaks in simple dialogues and expressions in the different characters. Its slightly dark and sarcastic but works with the tone of Laplace’s Witch.

Laplace's Witch

There is a certain charm to this novel adaptation. I have never read this novel before and know nothing about it. However, assuming its faithful to its novel as the screenplay writer is the author himself, this story has a lot of great elements. It has a strong scientific angle and also wraps in some supernatural aspect also. There’s a crime to solve which honestly is quite the head-scratcher seeing as any possibility has a near-zero chance of happening making it hard to determine. However, the introduction of the young woman who calls herself Laplace’s Witch aka Madoka (Suzu Hirose) is where the story brings in a lot of charisma. While her character feels rather simple and one-note whether in her expressions or her actions, Suzu Hirose ignites a convincing role which makes Madoka’s plight feels honorable and genuine and its makes us root for her. Paired along with the professor Shusuke Aoe (Sho Sakurai), they become quite the team especially since the professor is an oddball who shows genuine passion in his rare field of earth science that no one else seems interested in. There is some great charisma between these two characters. They are familiar characterizations but somehow work for this premise. In the spectrum of these two characters, a lot of scientific theories are put into the story including the main foundation of this movie being French mathematician Pierre Simon Laplace’s articulation called Laplace’s Demon.

Laplace's Witch

Disappointingly, where Laplace’s Witch starts to fall apart is in its pacing. The story while had its unique elements with the scientific aspects and discovering the root of the special abilities that Madoka possesses which leads to unveiling why she feels the urge to be involved in helping with the investigation alongside the professor. While the story itself has some nice twists and turns which are slightly fantastical and far-fetched, the fact that it is a Japanese film somehow makes these elements easily forgivable.  However, where this suffers is in its lengthy runtime of 2 hours and having its reveals set too early, making the final half feel dragged out. This lead to the well-developed first half to lose its intrigue quickly in the second half. There are some serious execution issues here that make the final thoughts of this movie feel simply bland and lackluster.

This review is also published on That Moment In.

The Favorite Foursome Blogathon: The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (2005)

You can check out the Favorite Foursome Blogathon hosted by Movie Movie Blog Blog and all the entries from the other participants HERE.

Thinking about favorite foursomes, there are so many to choose from. Be it something like cartoons or movies or other forms of pop culture in general, I’m at Montreal Comiccon this weekend so all kinds of pop culture is just smashing me in the face. However, one of my absolutely favorite ones goes to the four best friends in The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants. I am referring to the movie and not the book (since I’m a horrible procrastinator and haven’t gotten around to it). I’m considering this as a movie review however, a good part of what makes this movie shine is in the four young ladies and their journey and friendship.

The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (2005)

Director: Ken Kwapis

Cast: Amber Tamblyn, Alexis Bledel,America Ferrera, Blake Lively, Jenna Boyd, Bradley Whitford, Mike Vogel, Michael Rady

Four best girlfriends hatch a plan to stay connected with one another as their lives start off in different directions: they pass around a pair of secondhand jeans that fits each of their bodies perfectly. – IMDB

There’s a lot to love about The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants. I remember checking this out originally because of Blake Lively because of Gossip Girl. However, its the friendships here and the growth of each of these girls in their first summer apart that strengthens them not only their friendship but also themselves as they have to face their own different problems and grow up to be a little braver about embracing the different people they meet and spend the summer with. The idea of traveling pants is just the connection that they have and the magic that it holds in having a spiritual holder for the three others that aren’t with them wherever the pants are. It gives them a little update as the pants move around the world. Its grounded to some teenage issues and a lot of it is a coming of age where they learn to find themselves and be okay with sharing their own self and being vulnerable. Sure, its not your typical foursome as the movie sees them together only at the beginning and the end but you can see their friendship even as they are separate. The movie is so smart in doing that because together we get to see how each of them contrast in their personality and its this personality that makes also creates barriers. Before they had each other to love and be there to balance out each other, but apart they need to deal with a lot of these emotional things themselves. Its all part of growing up and that is what makes the Sisterhood of Traveling Pants such a great experience.

As we take a look at each of their journeys, they each have something to share that makes it so each to connect to. For Lena (Alexis Bledel), her personality is an introvert and fairly conservative. Her journey to Greece to visit her grandparents over the summer is an eye-opener because she needs to do things for herself now. She’s almost met the expectations of her family and being a good daughter. Same in Greece, she learns to communicate with her grandparents who don’t speak English well and her Greece is fairly non-existent. It creates the humor here. With that she meets Kostas who she learns has a conflict with her own family creating a barrier that she needs to choose despite her growing feelings. While Kostas is the person who breaks her out of her shell a little, Lena goes through quite the journey as she learns to be brave for herself and let herself be vulnerable and break down those walls that keeps her safe.

Almost opposite in personality, Bridget (Blake Lively) is outgoing and always gets what she wants. Off to Mexico for soccer camp, she goes against the rules to try to get the attention of one of the coaches. However, what comes tumbling back to her is that she doesn’t get everything that she wants and some of her deeper feelings are dug up when she has to face rejection. She may be good at a lot but it means nothing in the whole spectrum of things. Her journey brings back waves of how much she has hidden away those feelings of sadness and masked it with happiness. Dealing with grief and loss is her journey.

Carmen goes off to her father and learns that he is ready to marry another woman with two kids of her own. As she tries to embrace it and help with the wedding preparations, she starts feeling like she doesn’t belong. The feelings of abandonment and an outsider from her father who has always had a good relationship with her turns into quite a moment when she embraces that she is mad at him for the things he has done and how he has treated the situation. Yet again, admitting her feelings and just letting it go is her journey to face this new future and rebuild.

As for Tibby (Amber Tamblyn), the final piece of this foursome, who is the more sarcastic and cynical of the four has to stay home where she pursues making a documentary while working at Walmart. In this process, she meets an annoying girl who won’t leave her alone called Bailey. Suffice to say that, Bailey teaches her a little something about enjoying life even with its imperfections. While Tibby might feel abandoned by her friends and a complete loser for her situation, she learns the lesson to be grateful for the little happy moments in life and making those count for more than the bad.

Overall, what makes this journey worthwhile and these four work is their personalities. The jeans might be the glue that reminds them of the sisterhood that they trust and know that they always have their backs no matter where they are. Its a way to still share their lives and know when its time to make sure everyone is okay. Its this friendship that makes these four one of my faves. Their different personalities and the lessons they teach aren’t just for teenagers but some people of any age need to learn or just be reminded of it. The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants embrace strong sisterly friendships as well as sharing the differences they have and being able to make those into fun and emotional journeys. If you haven’t seen The Sisterhood of Traveling Pants, its really a great movie worth checking out.

Double Feature: The Little Death (2014) & Bang Gang (A Modern Love Story) (2015)

Double Feature

I’m really going on quite the theme in this and the last double feature. We are exploring the world of love and lust and sex. I go through phases like this where I like to dive into this world every once in a while. Netflix has been quite dry in this sense and I just took random choices as usual.

Let’s check out The Little Death and Bang Gang (A Modern Love Story).

The Little Death (2014)
(other title: A Funny Kind of Love)

the little death

Director (and writer): Josh Lawson

Cast: Josh Lawson, Bojana Novakovic, Damon Herriman, Kate Mulvany, Kate Box, Patrick Brammall, Alan Dukes, Lisa McCune, Erin James, T.J. Power, Kim Gyngell

The secret lives of five suburban couples living in Sydney reveal both the fetishes and the repercussions that come with sharing them. – IMDB

Movies with intertwining stories just get me. In many ways, its because of the variety of characters we get and the different stories that have a life of their own. There are sometimes fails in finding the proper balance especially with the topic (I’m looking at you New Year’s Eve). However, there are some that create some really nice parallels. The Little Death is the little Australian film that could in this sense. There are some odd moments here and there however, the different fetishes showcased here are incredibly interesting if not a little suitably over the top.

These five couples take a look at their different fetishes that one person in their relationship has and what has caused it to change no matter the initial discovery was for. The crazy part is that it creates these tensions in each of their relationship and as the audience, we can see it more than the characters themselves do especially when it comes to their choice to pursue it. While the five stories don’t overlap until the very end, we get the awkward moments with this new neighbor who was a sex offender giving the idea of the proximity of these couples and how each of them have their own struggles.

The Little Death is a fun dramedy of sorts. There are some outrageous moments and some stories that work better than others or at least presented better than others. As a debut, Josh Lawson offers up quite some depth in lust and seduction and relationships with these stories.

Bang Gang (A Modern Love Story) (2015)

bang gang

Director (and screenplay): Eva Husson

Cast: Finnegan Oldfield, Marilyn Lima, Lorenzo Lefebvre, Daisy Broom, Fred Hotier

In the well-to-do suburbs of a small town, a group of pretty average, well-adjusted sixteen and seventeen year olds are ordinary adolescents who take a singular path. – IMDB

This French movie takes on a ride through the lives of these five teens as their lives go out of control. Everything starts with the bored and lonely guy who has this fascination with sex and discovery and he ends up having sex with this girl who actually believes there was something more to discover that he had tossed her aside and moved on to someone else. With that discovery, she goes all out and creates this game during a party which is a truth or dare game except there are only dares and its mostly in the sexual nature and they called the whole thing Bang Gang and the chaos starts from there. As George gets more removed from the conflicts with them and throws herself into the party, she also meets Gabriel who is removed from her rowdy group but seems to hide a lot away.

This movie works because we see the different family situations and the ordinary in each of their lives and how they are very normal teenagers that just got caught up in friends, drugs and sex. This excitement is their little world to escape and have fun until things go horribly wrong and then if you are a parent watching this, perhaps its one of those nightmare moments. However, it also shows the lack of knowledge and naivety of these kids who have made decisions without actually thinking about the possible consequences.

For this young cast, its works really well. The outstanding performance is to Marilyn Lima who plays George. She is one of the key characters and we spend a lot of time looking at the choices she makes. At the same time, we also see Gabriel who doesn’t have as much of screen time but manages to deliver a character that we can care for in a more introverted trapped situation. There are a few pacing issues and some of the characters here aren’t really worth cheering for and it seems a stretch to think at the end that they did learn something from the whole debacle that went down, however the deeper message here makes us think a little about everything that happens.

That’s it for this double feature!
Something of a double theme on the theme and the fact that both are directed and written by one person.
Have you seen either of these movies?

TV Binge: Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events (Season 2, 2018)

It sure feels like a long time that I have been working on this TV Binge. A really long time! If you missed the Season 1 TV Binge post, you can find it HERE.

Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events (Season 2, 2018)

a series of unfortunate events s2

Cast: Neil Patrick Harris, Patrick Warburton, Malina Weissman, Louis Hynes, Presley Smith, K. Todd Freeman, Lucy Punch, Nathan Fillion, Sara Canning, Patrick Breen, Sara Rue

Stepping right off from Season 1, the Baudelaire Orphans now have gone through a bunch of odd guardians. Each one failing because of the horrible Count Olaf and his mischief or simply because they were some shady or clueless characters. Some cases even a mesh of the two components. It was filled with dark humor and a rather formulaic way of the Baudelaires always getting away. Entertaining as always but still the idea of the episodes always followed a same pattern. Unlike a lot of viewers, the first season took me a little while to get into. With where it left off in Season 1, this Netflix Original has established itself and its tone along with the characters so we should be in for a fun ride in Season 2.

Fortunately, we do get exactly that. Filled with more clever vocabulary lessons and random narration from Patrick Warburton in the oddest locations, the Baudelaires set off for a second season that is much more sinister and dangerous than the previous one. While the tone of the show hasn’t changed much, the events are more brutal. This is still a family show so the camera always cuts away from the potentially disgusting bits. Before we get ahead of ourselves too much, Season 2 covered Books 5 to 9 in the series: Austere Academy, Ersatz Elevator, Vile Village, Hostile Hospital and Carnivorous Carnival. Structured much like the first season, each book adaptation is separated into two parts. We get some new characters introduced (and in some cases, taken away). Honestly, I like this structure, it gives it a somewhat nice slice of moment. You can choose to binge watch the entire series if you want but you can also watch it like separate stories as the Baudelaires escape Count Olaf with less and less leeway leading to a nail-biting cliffhanger.

Overall, Season 2 is pretty strong. I got involved and immersed a lot quicker. It helps to see each of the characters grow more mature and smarter. The Baudelaires end up gaining a lot of coy and street smarts to pair with their natural intelligence. They each get their own spotlight, even little Sunny. The series remembers to be fair. As they get smarter, Count Olaf also devises much more intricate plans that give us surprises and each part as its own twists and turns that work to its advantage.

For things I loved/liked a lot in Season 2:

New Friends

A Series of Unfortunate Events

At the end of season 1, we stopped when we saw the Quagmires, now landing in the first six episode of this season. Quagmires and Baudelaires learn about their similarities and they are both brave and resourceful in their own ways. Call them the dynamic foursome if you will but the bonds they create in Austere Academy carries them to save these loyal friends for the next two stories in Ersatz Elevator and Vile Village. Its a nice change in pace to have them here. While most of the credit does go to following closely to the source materials pacing, it is nice to see these four work so well together. In these extreme situations, it is important to have allies.

New Villain

A Series of Unfortunate Events

Lucy Punch joins the villainous Count Olaf troupe  as the wealthy woman who is the student of Count Olaf and his girlfriend, Esme Squalor. She is packed with all kinds of accents and characters. Honestly, she is a joy to watch on screen. I’ve only seen her do weird odd roles in other movies before so its quite the breather to see her really embrace this role and take it in a wonderfully entertaining and wicked direction, especially in Hostile Hospital. She adds just a little bit of extra wickedness to Count Olaf which changes the game a little from the silly henchmen & henchwomen in his ragtag troop.

New VFD Members

a series of unfortunate events

VFD and a mysterious sugar bowl, along with the reveal of the narrator’s identity all get a part in Season 2. It adds depth and context as well as some answers to the million of questions stirring in our minds that are left unanswered for both the viewers and the Baudelaires. Nathan Fillion adds his charming self as Jacques Snicket who ends up recruiting Olivia Calaban, a librarian who tries to help the children and is smart enough to be suspicious. Olivia Calaban is a wonderful character played by Sara Rue and is eventually recruited into VFD. She has some of the answers but being new, she is more passionate about the mission that Jacques Snicket teaches her. They are a great team and as we learn about the VFD, we see that its a chase to figure out how everything pieces together.

New Locations

a series of unfortunate events

A Series of Unfortunate Events has been very location-based so far. In the first season, we had some incredibly imaginative locations belonging to an array of odd characters. In Season 2, we continue on with this trend. We see the Austere Academy and the orphan’s shack. In Ersatz Elevator, we move to a wealthy penthouse location as well as the various fishy (literally) restaurants. Then we move on to the Vile Village where crows migrate from one location to the next at a set routine. Hostile Hospital is a incomplete half hospital with one of its wings still in construction limbo and of course, the most fascinating of all, is the rundown circus of Madame Lulu’s Caligari Carnival. The production design and tone and lighting all add to the environment of the series.

Overall…I kept it quite to the point in this one. I still love the young cast playing the Baudelaire Orphans. They are fantastic. Neil Patrick Harris is great as Count Olaf. The success of Season 2 despite its episode formula is the depth of the story. We learn more, the characters develop further and the situation gets more dire and dangerous. It has all the great points of the first season and adds a little more, just enough to keep us curious but still unveiling a bit more to give the story some context. With the fantastic ending and the brilliant pacing in Season 2, I can’t wait for Season 3 (which should be the final season if they follow the progression of the books).

The Final Act of Joey Jumbler (Short 2018)

The Final Act of Joey Jumbler (Short 2018)

the final act of joey jumbler

Director (and writer): Harley Chamandy

A party clown must fight to keep his smile on. – IMDB

Have you ever wondered about the facades of the people you meet every single day? From the random passerby to the bus driver that you see everyday. Everyone greets and has all their polite moments, but the stories behind those smiles are sometimes the ones that we never expect. Its why we shouldn’t judge someone by what they do or who they are because everyone has hidden struggles that others do not know about. The Final Act of Joey Jumbler is exactly that. This short film takes us on a day in the life of Joey Jumbler as we see him start his day, go for his job as a clown/entertainer at a party and then back to his personal life, which is him trying to be happy and strong for his little girl.

There is a lot to love in The Final Act of Joey Jumbler. It runs at about 10 minutes and gives us appropriate pacing in telling this story. It hits some moments but never dwells on it for too long. In just a few locations and a few acts, we get the idea of the life and feelings that Joey Jumbler has. Part of this is for the main character, Alain Boucher as Joey Jumbler who delivers a great role. “In Memory Of” at the beginning of the credits also reveals that the story is inspired by Boucher’s real life story, who Chamandy previously worked with in his debut short, Mirage.  At the same time, the credit goes to this 18 year old young filmmaker, Harley Chamandy who directed and wrote this short film, as well as cinematographer, Stephanie Weber Biron, in their collaboration and knowing when to use close ups and frame the shots. Its delivers the emotions and struggles in a heartfelt way.

Everyone has their own story and no matter their profession, deserves their respect. That is one of the messages here. There are a variety of messages that Harley Chamandy’s short film is telling. Be it the difference of social ranking from the scene with Joey Jumbler ridiculed for doing his job but seemingly offending the rich adults of the party or the idea that having money doesn’t make you a better person as both the spoiled kids and the adults were obnoxious. If you look at Making Of this film, it talks about this scene relating to the divisive feelings and conflicts reflecting the Quebec Anglophone and Francophone community and the Quebec. While I do live in the community, perhaps I saw it more of a generalized view of the differences between just wealth and disrespect being the central issue. While that angle will give it more of a personal angle, it also creates a box for the audience it can reach because this is a more regional issue. Touchy issues are good to use however, in this case, Quebec Sovereignty and the obnoxious wealthy Anglophone only makes this movie pin a judgemental view of the two groups represented by only a few individuals. Living in Quebec personally, its one that is deeply rooted and deserves more than a simple one scene to reflect on, perhaps if this issue is one that holds so close to Chamandy’s heart, it is a potential next project but one to be treaded very carefully as with most political films.

At eighteen years old, Harley Chamandy shows a lot of promise in the storytelling depth. It will be interesting to see where this filmmaker will take his voice into a full-length film and what he will deliver next.

The Final Act of Joey Jumbler is currently available to view on Vimeo. Check it out HERE.