P.S. I Still Love You (To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before #2) by Jenny Han

If you missed the review of To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before, check it out here.

Rarely do I have back to back book reviews of the same series but To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before was so awesome that I couldn’t resist to finish up the sequel, P.S. I Still Love You. And here we are with the review.

P.S. I Still Love You
(To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before)
by: Jenny Han

p.s. i still love you

Lara Jean didn’t expect to really fall for Peter.
She and Peter were just pretending. Except suddenly they weren’t. Now Lara Jean is more confused than ever.
When another boy from her past returns to her life, Lara Jean’s feelings for him return too. Can a girl be in love with two boys at once? – Goodreads

Let’s just get this straight that P.S. I Still Love You is still quite the page turner. I finished it almost in one sitting and that is something that I haven’t done in quite a long time. However, as a sequel, this one does fall flat every once in a while. A few things going on here was fairly generic and I wasn’t particularly in agreement with some of the choices that Lara Jean made. But, one thing is for certain, Jenny Han writes and crafts some fantastic characters.

The Song sisters each are fun to read in their own way along with their dad in the little moments that they have. Lara Jean in particular is our girl here as the main character and she is very believable. 31 year old me may not agree with her choices but I still think back that 19 year old me in my first relationship when I had my first love and how I felt a lot of similar feelings. What is love, right? What is the right way to fall in love? Everyone approaches it differently and so does Lara Jean and Peter. Everyone also has their own burdens and baggage that they don’t want to share or just can’t.  It brings in the question of trust and loyalty. And its these traits that make them realistic and believable. Be it Lara Jean or Peter or the new addition, John. Its hard to wipe away the fact that they all are great to read and its even more apparent how well the characters are crafted and easy to connect to when their decisions evoke different feelings as I read it.

P.S. I Still Love You puts Lara Jean into a dilemma as she approaches her first real relationship. Its essentially the emotions of how much space to give and what type of girlfriend she wants to be and really how many barriers can you set or even how many rules can you make to prevent heartbreak? All these questions come together to craft up this first love and first relationship experience. Add in another love interest and neglect and lack of self-confidence and there you go. I mentioned before that this story has its faults of being generic but it delivers on being realistic although there are some aspects here that I don’t quite agree with. With that said, its more of a personal preference that I nitpick upon. It doesn’t wipe away the fact that this is a very fun novel to read.

Overall, P.S. I Still Love You is a worthy sequel. It lacks a little bit of the quirk and individuality that stood out in the first book, however its realistic and engaging characters definitely made this one a page turner.



To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han

Its felt like a while since I’ve dived into a YA and Romance novel. Separately, I’ve read each of those genres and nothing has really stood out in a while however, I’ve heard some good things about To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before so I was pretty excited to check this one out and toss those doubts out the window and give this one a chance. I didn’t know that this novel was the first book of a trilogy. The third book will come out this year, so its time to check it out, I’d assume.

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before
(To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before #1)
By: Jenny Han

to all the boys i've loved before

What if all the crushes you ever had found out how you felt about them… all at once?
Sixteen-year-old Lara Jean Song keeps her love letters in a hatbox her mother gave her. They aren’t love letters that anyone else wrote for her; these are ones she’s written. One for every boy she’s ever loved—five in all. When she writes, she pours out her heart and soul and says all the things she would never say in real life, because her letters are for her eyes only. Until the day her secret letters are mailed, and suddenly, Lara Jean’s love life goes from imaginary to out of control. – Goodreads

There’s something so honest about reading To All The Boys That I’ve Loved Before that pulled me into the story right from the beginning. Its been a while that I haven’t been that immersed into a book. Jenny Han definitely has a nice touch with bringing the Song girls to life and particularly our main character here, Lara Jean. Usually, we get stories about being chased or wanting a guy really badly. This story takes a refreshing new angle of how when the boys she loved before learns about her feelings, particularly one that she shouldn’t be having feeling for and she decides to fake it with another guy she used to love both sides trying to find their own way out that she gets caught up in something she doesn’t really understand anything about.

Its important to realize, and its what makes this story great that love comes in many forms as we grow up. When we do encounter love the first time, it might not be so apparent to realize until an epiphany hits and that can come at any time. Regardless, it takes courage to let go of fear of being hurt to hop into a relationship, no matter how old, and its because of all this, that To All The Boys That I’ve Love Before truly grabbed me. It tugged a little at my heartstrings but also gave a lot of really fun and satisfying moments while also giving enough drama and friction to make it engaging to keep wanting to see where Lara Jean’s choices would lead it.

At the same time, To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before also feels a bit like a teen comedy, something like The Edge of Seventeen or The First Time sort of thing, where its not only about the romance but also about Lara Jean’s personal growth as she embraces her feelings. People frequenting here probably hear me talking about that a lot, but thats because I always find the best stories, any kind of stories really, excel when they manage to create characters that change and grow. They learn to be a better form of themselves and the people that are around them contribute to them learning how to not be afraid to dig a little deeper in themselves and take chances which is exactly how Lara Jean’s character is. She’s not only smart and caring, but while she stays in her little space and doesn’t stand out, she learns how to break out of that shell and see her worth and find her confidence.

Overall, To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before was an absolute page-turner. To tell you  how much I loved it, I actually picked up the second book right away and have started reading it as this review goes live. I guess however, that this does take me to a final point which I always talk about in series and thats self-containment. This book literally ends on a cliffhanger, while I’m not a huge fan of that, it feels fairly obvious what her cliffhanger was leaning towards so it was a little easier to forgive. With that said, the book did so many things right and I loved how it was structured and written and the characters that I ended up giving it 5 stars on Goodreads, so I guess that shows how much I do love it.

The Dream of the Butterfly Vol. 1: Rabbits on the Moon by Richard Marazano & Luo Yin

The Dream of the Butterfly
Vol.1: Rabbits on the Moon

dream of the butterfly

By: Richard Marazano
Illustrated by: Luo Yin

Tutu is lost in a village where winter is eternal and the rabbits of the secret police find her guilty of one of the worst crimes imaginable—being a little girl! The Emperor of this strange town holds the key to her redemption, but it will come at a price. – Goodreads

Dream of the Butterfly is a beautifully drawn graphic novel heavily inspired by Hayao Miyazaki’s Spirited Away. It is no surprise that I am a huge fan of Studio Ghibli and that is probably th cover for this graphic novel caught my eye. I have no problem with being inspired by someone else and while some scenes feel very reminiscent of Spirited Away, it still has a decent flow of events, perhaps at times it loses itself in the trivial things but as a starting novel for a series, it feels like the idea of where the story goes is well enough. At the same time, the story also seems to revolve around a Chinese parable/folklore, especially apparent with its Volume 1 title about rabbits on the moon which is why on Moon Festival tins, you usually see a rabbit hopping around the Moon Goddess. At the same time, The Dream of the Butterfly is an actual Taoist philosophy sort of story which somewhat may link to the story here.  I appreciate that mostly because Chinese parables and Classic novels offer some incredible material that hasn’t quite made it into the Western world yet.

The only issue of the first volume of The Dream of the Butterfly is that it always feels like it is setting up the story for a more exciting second volume. While there were events to highlight the mysterious world that our main character has fallen into and the odd and quirky anthropomorphic characters she encounters, there creates too many mysteries and not really a lot of answers which makes it somewhat of a fruitless read. It may be the first book but in terms of pacing and set up, it might benefit from finding a better balance.

With that said, while its inspirations are very obvious, its art and world are respectively beautiful and intriguing to dive into. The first volume may have worked hard to set up and created some forced situations and had some pacing issues however, now that a good few events and characters are laid out, the second volume will hopefully get into much more intriguing things. If you are a fan of the Studio Ghibli and Alice in Wonderland sort of world, this is a decent choice to check out.

Goodreads: 3/5 (honestly, if Goodreads did half points, it would be a 3.5/5)

Received from Netgalley in exchange for honest review


Blog Tour: My Sweet Friend by H.A. Leuschel [Review + Giveaway]

My Sweet Friend Blog Tour

My Sweet Friend
by: H.A. Leuschel

my sweet friend

Publication Date: December 6, 2017
Genre: Contemporary Fiction/Women’s Fiction


A stand-alone novella from the author of Manipulated Lives

A perfect friend … or a perfect impostor?
Alexa is an energetic and charismatic professional and the new member of a Parisian PR company where she quickly befriends her colleagues Rosie and Jack. She brings a much-needed breath of fresh air into the office and ambitiously throws herself into her new job and friendships.
But is Alexa all she claims to be?
As her life intertwines with Rosie and Jack’s, they must all decide what separates truth from fiction. Will the stories that unfold unite or divide them? Can first impressions ever be trusted?
In this original novella, H.A. Leuschel evokes the powerful hold of appearances and what a person is prepared to do to keep up the facade. If you like thought-provoking and compelling reads with intriguing characters, My Sweet Friend is for you.


Purchase link here


My Sweet Friend is a well-paced and thought provoking character study. It structures the novella around the point of views of its two main characters, Rosie and Alexa. We soon learn that they were quick to become very good friends after Alexa gets hired to their office, both in the sales and marketing team. However, as it switches between a broken down Alexa on holiday in Biarritz and frantically scrambling to get a project done Rosie in Paris, the lies, secrets and manipulation start surfacing to the top. We start seeing the true colors of these characters, particularly Alexa. There’s a lot to love in this novella. Its writing style is fantastic and the description is incredibly vivid, making the characters come alive. This novella is also a breath of fresh air as it looks at a friendship between two women instead of a romance. While a third character, Jack, who is the manager gets involved as well as the ladies fight for his affection, he never becomes much of a key role. The first person narrative goes very well for this novella and the story it wants to tell.

Overall, My Sweet Friend is a really intriguing novella. Its paced well and takes its readers on a few mind games filled with lies and manipulation in this seemingly sweet friendship that breaks down as the characters reveal their true colors. My only criticism would be that the ending felt slightly lackluster, although to be fair, I have no idea how I would have preferred it to have ended. It still works in a thought-provoking way.

Goodreads: 4 out of 5 stars

Author Bio

H.A. Leuschel

Helene Andrea Leuschel grew up in Belgium where she gained a Licentiate in Journalism & Communication, which led to a career in radio and television in Brussels, London and Edinburgh. She now lives with her husband and two children in Portugal and recently acquired a Master of Philosophy with the OU, deepening her passion for the study of the mind. When she is not writing, Helene works as a freelance journalist and teaches yoga.



Enter for your chance to win a digital copy (Format of Choice) of My Sweet Friend
Link: http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/0e7c6a8f28/?

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Blog Tour: The Shadow Girl by Misty Mount (Review & Giveaway)

The Shadow Girl Blog Tour

The Shadow Girl
by: Misty Mount

The Shadow Girl

Genre: YA/Fantasy/Coming of Age

Date Published: December 28, 2017


Shy, thirteen-year-old Zylia has always known she was different. Most teenagers feel unnoticed and unseen, but for Zylia, it’s something much worse. She’s disappearing from this world and doesn’t know how to stop it. At times, she’s not sure she wants to. Until she stumbles across a family mystery surrounding the disappearance of her great-aunt Angelica years earlier. During her quest to unravel the mystery, Zylia discovers she’s able to cross the boundary and enter the “in between” world. Now, it’s up to Zylia to save herself before she’s trapped “in between” forever.


the shadow girl


Its been a while since a novel has taken me by surprise and The Shadow Girl definitely did do that. In its own unique way, it portrayed somewhat of a creepy fantasy world that happens to those who fall into the shadows or are invisible to the people around them or at least feel that they are and struggle to find ways to be seen as well as acknowledge their own presence. With that said, the message behind this novel is a very strong one especially when bookworms like myself struggle with a similar sort of scenario particularly when I was growing up. The desire to dive into the fantasy world is so strong. The Shadow Girl portrays that really well with her unique character of Zylia who grows up in a packed household full of kids and as she learns more about being in the shadows, she also realizes that she isn’t alone and being the strong character that Misty Mount has build, she makes decisions that will affect her fate. The story and the angle taken here is definitely the strength of this novel.

The novel did take a little while to take off as it set its stage. However, the slow start did help better understand the characters and the backstory while leaving out a little mystery as the plot thickened, The Shadow Girl became quite a page turner. There was a slight writing style inconsistency in certain parts but overall, the language used her was descriptive and vivid. I could almost feel Zylia’s emotions as well as the things she sees. Its always nice to see a YA novel that dives into the coming of age angle instead of a romantic and adventure sort of style. This dives into something much more realistic even if there are fantasy elements and focuses heavily on the underlying message it tries to bring up. Don’t get me wrong that there is an adventure because a personal journey and what happens to The Shadow Girl is absolutely a completely different type of adventure.

Goodreads score: 4/5


Barnes & Noble


Author Bio

Misty Mount

Misty Mount has written since age five and was first published at fourteen. By day she’s a caregiver, wife, and mother to a young son but during the quiet hours of night she becomes a novelist. She resides in Wichita, Kansas.




Giveaway: 1 print copy of The Shadow Girl and 2 digital copies

*Print copy is available to North American residents only

Tour organized by:



A Stone in the Sea (Bleeding Stars #1) by A.L. Jackson

I had a goal to go digging with something nice and romantic for the Valentine’s Marathon and I realized that I had stopped downloading romance books in a while. The only one that I found which I believe I had found fairly recently was this one called A Stone in the Sea which is the first book of the Bleeding Stars series. Never heard anything about this but then with movies, books and games, it is best to go in blind.

Let’s check it out!

A Stone in the Sea
(Bleeding Stars #1)
by: A.L. Jackson

a stone in the sea

Sunder lead singer and guitarist Sebastian Stone has everything—fans, fame, and fortune. He also has a heart full of bitterness and a reputation for a short-fused temper. But an outward reputation rarely reveals the true man inside. Facing assault charges after trying to protect his younger brother, Sebastian is sent to Savannah, Georgia to lie low until the dust settles in L.A. Shea Bentley is beautiful, kind, and hiding from the very lifestyle Sebastian has always embraced. When the mysterious, tattooed stranger begins hanging out at the bar where she works, Shea is quick to recognize he is nothing but trouble, but she’s helpless to the way her body lights up every time his intense gray eyes tangle with hers. They both soon find themselves drowning in a sea of desire and passion that won’t let them up for air. –Goodreads

Its been a tough ride of this genre of books of late. However, A Stone in the Sea is definitely a step in the right direction. The characters have some depth and back story. There are some very nice moments where other characters come into play to enforce a scene’s effectiveness. It banks a little on the sex scenes but that goes with the genre and those are quite well executed. What I did like the most was that one of the main characters, Shea was written quite self-aware of the normal tropes of the lady in this genre of books however, the frustrating parts is sometimes she will fall into those tropes and written as being irresistibly connected or in love with this mysterious Sebastian fellow. What does save the book a lot is the book structure which works in both Sebastian and Shea’s point of view. For the readers, we get the full picture and this helps us to accept situations as they occur and see how the characters react to know them a little better. At the same time, the supporting characters were quite unique and it would have been nice to have seen them get some bigger arcs as well.

Sadly, A Stone in the Sea was quite decent about halfway until things start getting on the repetitive side in the second half. Plus, a great deal of these books is buying into the characters and their scenarios and being able to imagine it. And in some of these, I’m not sure even my fantasies would wander in that direction and be okay with some of the heartbreaking moments. It hints at such a bad scenario that I wasn’t too fond of when the conflict broke the characters apart and the dialogue of the reconciliation. There were also these weird repeated words that popped up of their emotions or something that maybe reflected their feelings but it didn’t seem to do much for myself.

Overall, A Stone in the Sea is an average book. It works for the most part particularly in the first half. The second half becomes less intriguing to read due to distaste for certain characters and their decisions and the repetitive scenarios and dialogues that seem to dawn on the characters. The finale was also fairly easy to figure out before it ends in somewhat of a cliffhanger after a big reveal which as most of you know, I’m not a big fan of books that aren’t self-contained.


Remy’s Dilemma by Andrew Snook

Remy’s Dilemma is another book that I picked up at Toronto Comicon last year. It has been sitting on my desk for a while in the TBR pile and I finally decided that it was time to start it.

Remy’s Dilemma
By: Andrew Snook

The world is coming to an end. That’s what Remy Delemme believes, anyways. While double-checking his lifelong to-do list to ensure he has led a rich life, he realizes he hasn’t come close to completing his goals. Panicked and short on time, Remy embarks on a chaotic road trip to complete the most important item on his bucket list – finding the answer to man’s greatest question. There’s just one problem. Detective Tobias Gray, the most respected criminal profiler in the Toronto Police Department, thinks Remy is a serial killer; and he’s not the only one who has come to that conclusion. Armed with a green crayon, smiley-faced stamp and a pack of cigarettes in a race against time, Remy carves a path of hilarious destruction, baffling and infuriating the police, his government and every other person he encounters. – Goodreads

From start to finish, Remy’s Dilemma is odd. Its so very odd. It all dials down to Remy’s character and all the things that happen around him that are both out of this world and unexpected. Sometimes it was purely nonsensical. However, while it did take a while to adapt to the oddities of the story, once you do, it is quite a mesmerizing read if not to just see what happens to Remy and how he manages to achieve his bucket list before the end of the world. To be honest, reading this book reminded me a bit of when I read Mailman by J. Robert Lennon.

Being in Canada all my life, its hard to not feel a little more connected to this book. The author Andrew Snook does a great job at setting up this alternate reality or maybe a future scenario of Canada being broken down where the province of Quebec has finally broken apart from Canada and turned into their own countries. Only those quite familiar with the situation will feel the connections of it all which somewhat adds on to the absurdities of what this book gives to the readers, especially when you consider that his lifelong to-do list might seem quite normal but then he manages to tick off a few of these boxes on his little road trip and for a few categories multiple times. The structure of the book follows both Remy and Detective Tobias Gray both having their own ways of measuring their progress be in figuring out the suspect or getting closer to doing everything on the bucket list.

As silly and as crazy as this road trip with Remy becomes, the story never forgets to shed a little bit of a deeper light on its main character. As the story pulls to the ending, we start seeing something of a glimpse of what perhaps motivates Remy even if it is in somewhat of an unrealistic way. Why would this be realistic when almost everything else that has happened to him also is quite unrealistic and fairly nonsensical. Remy is a very colorful character full of weird decisions and its almost like he’s the guy who walks around and explosions follow him in those CGI heavy movies. Of course, while Remy is an intriguing character, the book is full of other characters like Tobias Gray who also has quite some depth to his character and brings some more serious vibes to the story. However, the story is also scatter with this cameos of characters that Remy encounters that all have their entertaining aspects.

Remy’s Dilemma takes a little getting used to its oddities at the start but it is also these oddities that escalate during the story that makes it a page-turner. Its a fast read. However, its setting might prove to be a little more welcoming to Canadians (particularly living in Ontario and Quebec). However, the geographic story doesn’t quite make that much of a difference here as the characters and scenarios more than makes up for all the entertaining elements. I can’t help to think that Remy’s Dilemma might not be for everyone as it is a rather dark humor sort of story and humor is quite subjective to everyone.