P.S. I Still Love You (To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before #2) by Jenny Han

If you missed the review of To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before, check it out here.

Rarely do I have back to back book reviews of the same series but To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before was so awesome that I couldn’t resist to finish up the sequel, P.S. I Still Love You. And here we are with the review.

P.S. I Still Love You
(To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before)
by: Jenny Han

p.s. i still love you

Lara Jean didn’t expect to really fall for Peter.
She and Peter were just pretending. Except suddenly they weren’t. Now Lara Jean is more confused than ever.
When another boy from her past returns to her life, Lara Jean’s feelings for him return too. Can a girl be in love with two boys at once? – Goodreads

Let’s just get this straight that P.S. I Still Love You is still quite the page turner. I finished it almost in one sitting and that is something that I haven’t done in quite a long time. However, as a sequel, this one does fall flat every once in a while. A few things going on here was fairly generic and I wasn’t particularly in agreement with some of the choices that Lara Jean made. But, one thing is for certain, Jenny Han writes and crafts some fantastic characters.

The Song sisters each are fun to read in their own way along with their dad in the little moments that they have. Lara Jean in particular is our girl here as the main character and she is very believable. 31 year old me may not agree with her choices but I still think back that 19 year old me in my first relationship when I had my first love and how I felt a lot of similar feelings. What is love, right? What is the right way to fall in love? Everyone approaches it differently and so does Lara Jean and Peter. Everyone also has their own burdens and baggage that they don’t want to share or just can’t.  It brings in the question of trust and loyalty. And its these traits that make them realistic and believable. Be it Lara Jean or Peter or the new addition, John. Its hard to wipe away the fact that they all are great to read and its even more apparent how well the characters are crafted and easy to connect to when their decisions evoke different feelings as I read it.

P.S. I Still Love You puts Lara Jean into a dilemma as she approaches her first real relationship. Its essentially the emotions of how much space to give and what type of girlfriend she wants to be and really how many barriers can you set or even how many rules can you make to prevent heartbreak? All these questions come together to craft up this first love and first relationship experience. Add in another love interest and neglect and lack of self-confidence and there you go. I mentioned before that this story has its faults of being generic but it delivers on being realistic although there are some aspects here that I don’t quite agree with. With that said, its more of a personal preference that I nitpick upon. It doesn’t wipe away the fact that this is a very fun novel to read.

Overall, P.S. I Still Love You is a worthy sequel. It lacks a little bit of the quirk and individuality that stood out in the first book, however its realistic and engaging characters definitely made this one a page turner.



Blog Tour: The Shadow Girl by Misty Mount (Review & Giveaway)

The Shadow Girl Blog Tour

The Shadow Girl
by: Misty Mount

The Shadow Girl

Genre: YA/Fantasy/Coming of Age

Date Published: December 28, 2017


Shy, thirteen-year-old Zylia has always known she was different. Most teenagers feel unnoticed and unseen, but for Zylia, it’s something much worse. She’s disappearing from this world and doesn’t know how to stop it. At times, she’s not sure she wants to. Until she stumbles across a family mystery surrounding the disappearance of her great-aunt Angelica years earlier. During her quest to unravel the mystery, Zylia discovers she’s able to cross the boundary and enter the “in between” world. Now, it’s up to Zylia to save herself before she’s trapped “in between” forever.


the shadow girl


Its been a while since a novel has taken me by surprise and The Shadow Girl definitely did do that. In its own unique way, it portrayed somewhat of a creepy fantasy world that happens to those who fall into the shadows or are invisible to the people around them or at least feel that they are and struggle to find ways to be seen as well as acknowledge their own presence. With that said, the message behind this novel is a very strong one especially when bookworms like myself struggle with a similar sort of scenario particularly when I was growing up. The desire to dive into the fantasy world is so strong. The Shadow Girl portrays that really well with her unique character of Zylia who grows up in a packed household full of kids and as she learns more about being in the shadows, she also realizes that she isn’t alone and being the strong character that Misty Mount has build, she makes decisions that will affect her fate. The story and the angle taken here is definitely the strength of this novel.

The novel did take a little while to take off as it set its stage. However, the slow start did help better understand the characters and the backstory while leaving out a little mystery as the plot thickened, The Shadow Girl became quite a page turner. There was a slight writing style inconsistency in certain parts but overall, the language used her was descriptive and vivid. I could almost feel Zylia’s emotions as well as the things she sees. Its always nice to see a YA novel that dives into the coming of age angle instead of a romantic and adventure sort of style. This dives into something much more realistic even if there are fantasy elements and focuses heavily on the underlying message it tries to bring up. Don’t get me wrong that there is an adventure because a personal journey and what happens to The Shadow Girl is absolutely a completely different type of adventure.

Goodreads score: 4/5


Barnes & Noble


Author Bio

Misty Mount

Misty Mount has written since age five and was first published at fourteen. By day she’s a caregiver, wife, and mother to a young son but during the quiet hours of night she becomes a novelist. She resides in Wichita, Kansas.




Giveaway: 1 print copy of The Shadow Girl and 2 digital copies

*Print copy is available to North American residents only

Tour organized by:


A Stone in the Sea (Bleeding Stars #1) by A.L. Jackson

I had a goal to go digging with something nice and romantic for the Valentine’s Marathon and I realized that I had stopped downloading romance books in a while. The only one that I found which I believe I had found fairly recently was this one called A Stone in the Sea which is the first book of the Bleeding Stars series. Never heard anything about this but then with movies, books and games, it is best to go in blind.

Let’s check it out!

A Stone in the Sea
(Bleeding Stars #1)
by: A.L. Jackson

a stone in the sea

Sunder lead singer and guitarist Sebastian Stone has everything—fans, fame, and fortune. He also has a heart full of bitterness and a reputation for a short-fused temper. But an outward reputation rarely reveals the true man inside. Facing assault charges after trying to protect his younger brother, Sebastian is sent to Savannah, Georgia to lie low until the dust settles in L.A. Shea Bentley is beautiful, kind, and hiding from the very lifestyle Sebastian has always embraced. When the mysterious, tattooed stranger begins hanging out at the bar where she works, Shea is quick to recognize he is nothing but trouble, but she’s helpless to the way her body lights up every time his intense gray eyes tangle with hers. They both soon find themselves drowning in a sea of desire and passion that won’t let them up for air. –Goodreads

Its been a tough ride of this genre of books of late. However, A Stone in the Sea is definitely a step in the right direction. The characters have some depth and back story. There are some very nice moments where other characters come into play to enforce a scene’s effectiveness. It banks a little on the sex scenes but that goes with the genre and those are quite well executed. What I did like the most was that one of the main characters, Shea was written quite self-aware of the normal tropes of the lady in this genre of books however, the frustrating parts is sometimes she will fall into those tropes and written as being irresistibly connected or in love with this mysterious Sebastian fellow. What does save the book a lot is the book structure which works in both Sebastian and Shea’s point of view. For the readers, we get the full picture and this helps us to accept situations as they occur and see how the characters react to know them a little better. At the same time, the supporting characters were quite unique and it would have been nice to have seen them get some bigger arcs as well.

Sadly, A Stone in the Sea was quite decent about halfway until things start getting on the repetitive side in the second half. Plus, a great deal of these books is buying into the characters and their scenarios and being able to imagine it. And in some of these, I’m not sure even my fantasies would wander in that direction and be okay with some of the heartbreaking moments. It hints at such a bad scenario that I wasn’t too fond of when the conflict broke the characters apart and the dialogue of the reconciliation. There were also these weird repeated words that popped up of their emotions or something that maybe reflected their feelings but it didn’t seem to do much for myself.

Overall, A Stone in the Sea is an average book. It works for the most part particularly in the first half. The second half becomes less intriguing to read due to distaste for certain characters and their decisions and the repetitive scenarios and dialogues that seem to dawn on the characters. The finale was also fairly easy to figure out before it ends in somewhat of a cliffhanger after a big reveal which as most of you know, I’m not a big fan of books that aren’t self-contained.


Remy’s Dilemma by Andrew Snook

Remy’s Dilemma is another book that I picked up at Toronto Comicon last year. It has been sitting on my desk for a while in the TBR pile and I finally decided that it was time to start it.

Remy’s Dilemma
By: Andrew Snook

The world is coming to an end. That’s what Remy Delemme believes, anyways. While double-checking his lifelong to-do list to ensure he has led a rich life, he realizes he hasn’t come close to completing his goals. Panicked and short on time, Remy embarks on a chaotic road trip to complete the most important item on his bucket list – finding the answer to man’s greatest question. There’s just one problem. Detective Tobias Gray, the most respected criminal profiler in the Toronto Police Department, thinks Remy is a serial killer; and he’s not the only one who has come to that conclusion. Armed with a green crayon, smiley-faced stamp and a pack of cigarettes in a race against time, Remy carves a path of hilarious destruction, baffling and infuriating the police, his government and every other person he encounters. – Goodreads

From start to finish, Remy’s Dilemma is odd. Its so very odd. It all dials down to Remy’s character and all the things that happen around him that are both out of this world and unexpected. Sometimes it was purely nonsensical. However, while it did take a while to adapt to the oddities of the story, once you do, it is quite a mesmerizing read if not to just see what happens to Remy and how he manages to achieve his bucket list before the end of the world. To be honest, reading this book reminded me a bit of when I read Mailman by J. Robert Lennon.

Being in Canada all my life, its hard to not feel a little more connected to this book. The author Andrew Snook does a great job at setting up this alternate reality or maybe a future scenario of Canada being broken down where the province of Quebec has finally broken apart from Canada and turned into their own countries. Only those quite familiar with the situation will feel the connections of it all which somewhat adds on to the absurdities of what this book gives to the readers, especially when you consider that his lifelong to-do list might seem quite normal but then he manages to tick off a few of these boxes on his little road trip and for a few categories multiple times. The structure of the book follows both Remy and Detective Tobias Gray both having their own ways of measuring their progress be in figuring out the suspect or getting closer to doing everything on the bucket list.

As silly and as crazy as this road trip with Remy becomes, the story never forgets to shed a little bit of a deeper light on its main character. As the story pulls to the ending, we start seeing something of a glimpse of what perhaps motivates Remy even if it is in somewhat of an unrealistic way. Why would this be realistic when almost everything else that has happened to him also is quite unrealistic and fairly nonsensical. Remy is a very colorful character full of weird decisions and its almost like he’s the guy who walks around and explosions follow him in those CGI heavy movies. Of course, while Remy is an intriguing character, the book is full of other characters like Tobias Gray who also has quite some depth to his character and brings some more serious vibes to the story. However, the story is also scatter with this cameos of characters that Remy encounters that all have their entertaining aspects.

Remy’s Dilemma takes a little getting used to its oddities at the start but it is also these oddities that escalate during the story that makes it a page-turner. Its a fast read. However, its setting might prove to be a little more welcoming to Canadians (particularly living in Ontario and Quebec). However, the geographic story doesn’t quite make that much of a difference here as the characters and scenarios more than makes up for all the entertaining elements. I can’t help to think that Remy’s Dilemma might not be for everyone as it is a rather dark humor sort of story and humor is quite subjective to everyone.


Cinder (The Lunar Chronicles #1) by Marissa Meyers

Goodreads Challenge progress: 2 out of 25

Next up in the reading adventures is Cinder, which is the first book in The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyers. I’ve heard some really great stuff about this book. However, there is always a fear nowadays as I’m starting to realize that I’m breaking away personally from the YA books and starting to not enjoy them as much, but this book does have the twist on a fairy tale that I have yet to break out of.

Let’s check it out!

Cinder (The Lunar Chronicles #1)
by: Marissa Meyers


Humans and androids crowd the raucous streets of New Beijing. A deadly plague ravages the population. From space, a ruthless lunar people watch, waiting to make their move. No one knows that Earth’s fate hinges on one girl.
Cinder, a gifted mechanic, is a cyborg. She’s a second-class citizen with a mysterious past, reviled by her stepmother and blamed for her stepsister’s illness. But when her life becomes intertwined with the handsome Prince Kai’s, she suddenly finds herself at the center of an intergalactic struggle, and a forbidden attraction. Caught between duty and freedom, loyalty and betrayal, she must uncover secrets about her past in order to protect her world’s future. – Goodreads

Consider me a little biased but I love it when people manage to twist up something and then set it into somewhere in China. In this case, the setting is in New Beijing and for the most part, there are some fun little bits to make it all work out in this new setting. Props to Marissa Meyers for her wonderful world building for this futuristic world where people are living on planets and much like history repeats itself, New Beijing is plagued with a disease that the kingdom is trying to find a cure for. However, the twist here is that there are also cyborg-like people which have been mended back through robotics to function making this part human and part cyborg and that is what our main character Cinder is. The world and characters here are very much livened up because of Marissa Meyers fantastic descriptive writing style. She manages to paint the world so that the reader can see in their heads what is going on.

Aside from that, Cinder is a very well-constructed character. She has quite the character and has a nice balance between her emotional sensitivity and her intelligence which works well for her story here. She has to keep certain secrets as she learns more about her background while adapting to the new situations she gets caught up in whether with her stepmother/guardian or her sisters or the prince or even the Queen of Luna. On top of that, we also see where Prince Kai stands in this mess as he figures out the dilemma he is faced with when the disease takes away his father and what seems like the only solution tests who he can actually trust in the kingdom. There are conflicts and secrets and mysteries at every turn. While there are more than enough clues to hint at what the end game is making it slightly more predictable than I would have like, it still is fairly clever for what the story it is trying to tell.

Cinder was an absolute page turner. In fact, I can’t remember the last time I read a Young Adult novel and was that caught up in a story. There is a great world-building and character arcs and while this book focuses on Cinder, the next books in the series will introduce other popular fairy tale characters and their twists. It seems that they will eventually cross paths as this one also introduces another fairy tale character. Its definitely one I’m looking forward to reading the second book.


Blog Tour: White Water Black Death by Shaun Ebelthite

Blog Tour

White Water Black Death

White Water Black Death

Author: Shaun Eblethite

Publication Date: September 2017

Genre: Thriller/Suspense


“A cruise ship is the perfect target for a biological attack”. These are the chilling words emailed to the Seaborne Symphony in the mid-Atlantic.

Magazine editor Geneva Jones has been sent on the trans-Atlantic cruise to help secure a major advertising agreement from the CEO of the cruise line Rachel Atkinson, but her efforts to win her over are curtailed by a mysterious crew death. Geneva suspects foul play. Rachel insists its suicide. A former investigative journalist, Geneva can’t resist digging deeper, but what she finds is far more devastating. There’s an Ebola outbreak on the ship, everyone is trapped aboard and Rachel is trying to keep it secret.

Geneva knows enough about Ebola to be terrified, but she’s also onto the biggest story of her career. As panic surges through the ship, she becomes fixated on a single question. How was the virus brought aboard? The answer is worse than she could have imagined, and the greatest exposé she’ll ever get, if she can only prove it.

Add to Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/35905923-white-water-black-death?ac=1&from_search=true

Purchase link: https://www.amazon.com/White-Water-Black-Death-terrifying-ebook/dp/B074Y4X37Y


White Water, Black Death is a very well-written suspense thriller that takes its readers for possibly one of the most dreaded cruise experiences anyone would think of. It takes us for a thrilling anniversary cruise with many twists as it starts off with a suspected murder which turns quickly into a mysterious deadly epidemic that spirals worse and worse. The story is told using the measure of days past on the cruise and the time stamps of the different events which helps with feeling more immersed into the story. The structure fits well. However, White Water Black Death does start off a tad slow as it sets up its characters. At the same time, the characters are a little overwhelming in the beginning as well as there are a lot of characters that eventually do play key parts in this thriller however most don’t truly feel like any that you can get behind as they are developed to be quite horrible people. For some other ones, the vast amount of characters do have a slight impact on having some underdeveloped characters. However, it does a great job in specifically choosing a few characters to focus heavily on to drive the story forward.

Thrillers (both books and movies alike) thrive on its mystery and building up a scenario that intrigues its audience to piece together its story in its final reveal. White Water Black Death achieves that very well. However, the only criticism is to have hidden the entire Ebola outbreak part in its synopsis because it takes away what the mystery of discovering what had hit the ship in the first place and makes the whole set-up to figuring that out  lose its mystery. The author does a great job and building that mystery and it feels a shame to have it revealed before the reader even starts the novel. Part of my enjoyment of the book came from not having read the synopsis in advance and only knowing the bare minimum. White Water Black Death is a page turner and as a thriller it delivers with its incredible delivery to structure a story that achieves both building the suspense and creating vivid and effectively descriptive scenes that truly help visualize each moment especially when the situation intensifies, making it a gripping page-turner.

Overall, White Water, Black Death is a great suspenseful thriller that does a great job and building its story and pieces to make it both an intriguing and gripping reading experience. While it falls short in a few places, it still works effectively and incredibly well.

Goodreads score: 4/5

About the Author

shaun ebelthite

Shaun Ebelthite was born in Namibia, raised in South Africa and educated in Dubai in the Middle East where he is a maritime and cruise journalist. He has been covering all aspects of ocean transport for more than five years and runs the Middle East’s foremost online cruise magazine. He has had two children’s books published, and is now branching out into a new genre with his first thriller.

Cruise Arabia (https://cruisearabiaonline.com)


Giveaway: 3 Digital copies of “White Water, Black Death” in Format of Choice

Giveaway Link: http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/0e7c6a8f21/?

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The 100 (The 100 #1) by Kass Morgan

After the continued efforts to finish reading IT, I have decided to change up the pace yet again and switch between IT and other books sitting in my Kindle mostly because lugging around that 1400 page novel is really heavy and giving me back pains that my chiropractor isn’t too happy about. With that said, I dug out my Kindle and decided to work on some novels I picked up in 2015 thats been sitting in my Kindle unread. With a longing to get back to the TV series for The 100, I decided to check out the book that the show is based on. This is the first in the series.

Let’s check it out!

The 100
By: Kass Morgan

Ever since a devastating nuclear war, humanity has lived on spaceships far above Earth’s radioactive surface. Now, one hundred juvenile delinquents — considered expendable by society — are being sent on a dangerous mission: to recolonize the planet. It could be their second chance at life…or it could be a suicide mission…Confronted with a savage land and haunted by secrets from their pasts, the hundred must fight to survive. They were never meant to be heroes, but they may be mankind’s last hope. – Goodreads

In terms of dystopian settings, The 100 has decent one and with everything in the recent years, perhaps it even feels possible that if a nuclear bomb where to go off, the world’s backup would be to evacuate a certain few groups to space to survive while the radiation tapers off and Earth becomes viable again. Being a fan of the adaptation always makes it hard to read the source material because it makes you have a comparison. The 100 is a good book with the focus of the perspectives of four characters: Clarke, Wells, Bellamy and Glass. It takes us on both the Ark and the struggles there while also looking at the issues with not being on Earth but dropping a bunch of juvenile delinquents on Earth.

Using the four perspectives are good, it helps broaden the story and give the readers a point of reference and it allows us to learn about the characters, especially as it breaks down how and why they got arrested which highlights who these four are. I don’t quite mind the character development and the story or setting as much as I don’t quite like the descriptive nature of the writing. That honestly is a personal preference. Its easy to read but some parts hop onto slight cliches and it felt slightly corny plus, there was a heavy romantic angle focus which I have mixed feelings about. The 100 felt like in this first book to scrape the surface. It went through the motions of giving us the key plots and then the crisis on The Ark and ends with The 100 faced with their first threat, other people on the ground attacking them. With that said, I like my books self-contained even if it is a series. A good series can end their story and still intrigue their readers to come back in the sequel. The 100 has that intrigue just in its premise so it doesn’t need the cliffhanger ending.

I think this brings us to talk about the changes from the TV series to the book. For one, the entire arc of Glass and Luke are removed in the show however, the show gives a wider group of characters with their own skillset that are beneficial to the group. In this first book, the set up is quite lacking as they only end with realizing that people do live on Earth. Our characters and their leadership and intentions are diffferent also. Clarke is still strong but not quite the leader she is in the show which honestly is what I love about her in The 100. Bellamy also gets a more extreme character where he lacks his presence here. Although you do have to say that they do feel more like lost kids in this book because this is all new to them and between the dazzlement of being on land, it also emphasizes on the lack of knowledge.

The 100 was a good read. It has the right idea and to be honest, I think the show, only referring to the first season, actually takes its characters on a deeper journey than what the book does. While it is good to focus on a few characters and their arcs, the story could be so much better focusing on the dystopia and the new world they are in rather than the petty romance. Even if I am a Bellamy and Clarke fan from the series, it still was a little too much especially in some of the descriptive writing. The style just lacked a little something for me. It usually is a good move to step away from the soure material and in this case, it worked for the broaden scope of tv series.

If anything, reading The 100 has made me want to restart the series to refresh my memory ( not that I really need to) and catch up with season 3 and 4.