Double Feature: Future World (2018) & Jumanji: The Next Level (2019)

Today’s double feature is a more action/adventure sort of deal. The pairing of 2018’s Future World set in a future dystopia wasteland and 2019’s sequel of Jumanji where they head back into Jumanji a second time in Jumanji: The Next Level with a little twist.

Let’s check it out!

Future World (2018)

Director: James Franco & Bruce Thierry Cheung

Cast: James Franco, Suki Waterhouse, Jeff Wahlberg, Margarita Levieva, Snoop Dogg, Lucy Liu, Milla Jovovich

A young boy searches a future world wasteland for a rumored cure for his dying mother. – IMDB

Science fiction, action, adventure, Western: all these are categories of what Future World is described. Most of people familiar with my tastes in movies know that I do enjoy mixed genre films and yet, not such a big fan of Westerns (mostly because I just haven’t found many that I liked before). Future World is kind of like the direct to video version of Mad Max: Fury Road. At least its comparable in color tones and atmosphere and even some of the design elements. With that said, the world itself is fairly cool especially as it goes into different places and meeting the different rulers in the various corners of this wasteland.

Where Future World feels a bit messy might actually be in its male lead as a younger boy Prince looking for this rumored medicine for her mother and to save his land. Call it trials for the boy or whatever you want because he falls into a lot of trouble and makes some bad decisions, maybe trying to highlight his naivety to the world around him. Prince becomes this fairly frustrating character to watch.

However, the movie does take things to quite the action level. There are some fun cinematography here as it directs the camera through some cool sequences and such. The best probably with the Drug Lord, played by Milla Jovovich who takes it to this wild level that I kind of like quite a bit. With that, there are some interesting characters in these different groups mentioned before with Love Lord by Snoop Dogg, which is a rather minor role and the persistent Warlord played by James Franco (that also takes on the co-director role in this film) who shows up throughout because of this Android girl Ash (Suki Waterhouse) who goes rogue and decides to save the Prince. And finally, the Queen that the Prince is trying to save is played by Lucy Liu.

Future World is not exactly a good movie. There are some issues with it and probably the Prince being this character that’s hard to get behind is one of the biggest things. And yet, there is a fun element to it probably because of these over the top characters like James Franco who does crazy really well (which reminded me a little of what I loved about this role in Springbreakers) and Milla Jovovich who also has extended a little outside of her Alice role in the Resident Evil series more and more. Sure, she’s not exactly a great actress but she takes on these roles and its a fun time for her sequences. Is the movie as a whole a fun time? Not really.

Jumanji: The Next Level (2019)

Director (and co-writer): Jake Kasdan

Cast: Dwayne Johnson, Jack Black, Kevin Hart, Karen Gillan, Awkwafina, Nick Jonas, Alex Wolff, Morgan Turner, Madison Iseman, Ser’Darius Blain, Danny DeVito, Danny Glover

In Jumanji: The Next Level, the gang is back but the game has changed. As they return to rescue one of their own, the players will have to brave parts unknown from arid deserts to snowy mountains, to escape the world’s most dangerous game. – IMDB

Jumanji: The Next Level is the sequel to 2017’s Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (review), which of course continues on with the Jumanji franchise, something that I’m sure not a whole lot of people were banking that it would keep going and probably not even the success it should be. The Next Level is pretty fun and keeps to the tone of the first one. It takes away the Alex Wolff character, Spencer for a little while as his friends hunt him down and end up going back into the game that takes them onto a much more dangerous adventure except this time, they are tagged along with grandparents, played by Danny DeVito and Danny Glover who in the real world has their own issues to iron out after a decision to end their restaurant business. Because of these two’s bickering and the bodies that that they take over, it becomes a hilarious romp. Not to mention, the crew goes to track down Spencer’s whereabouts who ends up being embodied in a female character, Ming portrayed by Awkwafina (who is just showing up everywhere).

Jumanji: The Next Level is a decent sequel. It maintains a lot of the fun and humor from the first movie and carries forward with the characters adding a little switch in the in-game characters and who they end up embodying. At the same time, the Jumanji world has changed also into something of an another game with other objectives while also changing the characters from the previous movies strengths and weaknesses. Sure, it might flow much better for people who have seen the first movie and lacks that standalone quality to it but Jumanji, no matter which movie we’re talking about, isn’t exactly a hard movie to catch up on story-wise.

Overall, there isn’t a whole lot to say about Jumanji: The Next Level. If you like this type of action-adventure film and Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart and Jack Black’s humor is your cup of tea, this movie is a fun movie to watch. Sure, its better if you have seen the first movie before watching this one but both of them are good in their own very similar ways and this one does add changes that do fit well with the story they are telling. Plus, the cast is still pretty awesome especially with the addition of Danny Glover and Danny DeVito even if I kind of feel like the whole story between those two and the whole relationship of Spencer seems a little trivial to the whole story but it does create a link between the different pieces so overall, its still a fun time.

Blog Tour: No Signal (iMe Series #2) by Jem Tugwell

NO SIGNAL BLOG TOUR v2

No Signal (iMe series #2)
By: Jem Tugwell

No Signal

Publisher: Serpentine Books
Publication Date: June 4th, 2020
Pages: 336
Available in Paperback, eBook & Audio

In a breathtaking follow-up novel to ‘PROXIMITY’, Serge says it’s the ultimate Augmented Reality game. He’s chosen his Ten carefully – the reckless, driven and strong. He tests them. Ten become Four.
DI Clive Lussac wants to fight the system that controls everything, but he’s ill and losing the people closest to him. In the middle of eco-protests, he’s lost four tourists.
As Clive’s world unravels, he and his partners DC Ava Miller and DS Zoe Jordan race to find the tourists and the true reason behind the game. It may already be too late. – Goodreads

No Signal is the sequel of Proximity, the second book in the iMe series. While the first book was set on creating a technothriller set in a futuristic dystopia where technology has now become the tool that governs every single person’s life to every single detail to create a crime free and healthy society through their technology iMe and set a very solid foundation for this world building. No Signal had a kick-off point in this established world that took a different path. This time, its not about a crime set in one city using the technology and the different ways its governed from police to citizens to all the red tape involved but it takes the angle of a further technology called iTourist that sees a person who creates this augmented reality game that leads the four remaining challengers from around the world to enter into this controlled world to race for a big prize at the finish line. Other than the technology and crime-solving elements, this story also has dives into a little bit of this dystopian future’s politics.

No Signal is divided chapter to chapter from a few different point of view.  Its a lot of characters to maneuver at first as it bounces between last book’s main character police detective Clive Lussac, “game master” Serge and the four challengers. This is a great structure to approach this story as it gives a good overlap from one location to the next while also being able to keep the book paced incredibly well and really action-packed and also to connect better with each of these characters. The connection from the first book actually is only through Clive Lussac and his character still maintains a lot of the traits from the first one that makes him notice the things and plays along the more experienced cop role as he leads another younger partner after his partner in the last one has moved to another department. If there was anything, it felt a little unnecessary to put in his personal life drama. It connects to the first one and maybe makes him more human but the story stood well enough on its own focusing on the thriller on hand.

One of the most outstanding parts of this series is definitely the use of its technology. The technology itself has so much detail from how it evolves and what it is capable of doing. iMe still plays a lot as it controls the citizens in this space whereas the rest of the world seems to not be controlled like this future UK. As it brings people from outside of this country inside, the technology behind iTourist is really only an introduction but it adds another element when the scenario changes as they find a way to complete their challenge without this country’s monitoring. Every point of No Signal is done with a lot of thought in its execution and how each plot point should land and give it further intrigue and thrills. For a sequel, it keeps the same intensity as its first book and dives deeper into this world. Honestly, I can’t wait to see where else this world can go to hopefully a next novel.

Score: 4.5 out of 5 

You can also check out the review of the the first book, Proximity HERE.

Amazon Australia : https://amzn.to/2WcgE2z
Goodreads link  : https://bit.ly/2WbnhSN
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Jem Tugwell is a crime fiction author with a Crime Writing MA from City University.
NO SIGNAL is the second book in the iMe series and follows his thrilling debut novel PROXIMITY.
Jem is inspired by the fascinating possibilities of technology, AI and the law of unintended consequences. In a past life, Jem had a successful career in technology and investment management, and he lives in Surrey with his wife and dog. He has two great children. Outside of his family and writing, Jem’s loves are snowboarding, old cars and bikes.
GIVEAWAY
As part of the blog tour, Serpentine Books is running a Rafflecopter competition to give a way 2 signed copies of Proximity (it is open to UK addresses only).

Blackthorn by Terry Tyler

Blackthorn
By: Terry Tyler

Blackthorn

The UK, year 2139
One hundred and fifteen years ago, a mysterious virus wiped out ninety-five per cent of humanity.  Blackthorn, the largest settlement in England, rose from the ashes of the devastated old world. It is a troubled city, where the workers live in crude shacks, and make do with the worst of everything.  It is a city of violent divisions, crime, and an over-populated jail block―until a charismatic traveller has a miraculous vision and promises to bring hope back to the people’s lives.  Blackthorn falls under Ryder Swift’s spell, and the most devoted of all is the governor’s loyal servant, Lieutenant August Hemsley.  Twenty-one-year-old Evie has lived her whole life in the shacks. She and disillusioned guard Byron Lewis are two of a minority who have doubts about Ryder’s message. Can they stand against the beliefs of an entire city? – Goodreads

Blackthorn is a story about beliefs and cults in a dystopian future where the balance has been offset. In the current state of the world, calculating back the years of how this story is sets up its future scenario, it almost hits a little too close to home. However, much like the other book that I read Hope from Terry Tyler, this author excels in building immersive dystopia worlds. In Blackthorn, its one that works thoroughly from the society’s lowered population built up and almost driving everything back to the basics in older times with different societal classes doing different jobs and someone ruling over the different cities/districts by richer families and the concept to carry on the family name by passing it on.

This brings in all kinds of characters that weave together a story of bringing back the concept of faith in the Bible and having the community come together to be better in order to reach the Light. With that, it brings up questions of how truthful the situation actually is as well as the motives of different decisions by the different characters that manage to bring in some deeper characters. Characters is where the story is executed well as it bounces between the perspective of three characters: Lieutenant August Hemsley, a lower class baker Evie and guard Byron Lewis. Their different perspectives of the different elements of the society completes the picture in many of the scenarios and fills in those blanks to connect the dots while at the same time, having perspectives from different characters also creates enough gaps of the unknown to have their own secrets and msyteries in the story that slowly unveil in the third part. With that said, the book is divided into three parts plus an epilogue, giving it a progression of time and shift in time and events as well as Blackthorn’s position.

If there was something to criticize about this book, its that the pacing at times felt lacking here and there. It had to do with its length perhaps and that some moments were made to create a link between the perspectives of the three. Provided that most of the time, the three views did work very well together but at times, it did make some situations a little longer to read. Plus, with three characters, it also needs to create enough dilemmas to solidify their purpose, push and feelings towards the society and predicament. Although, I say this, overall Blackthorn is a satisfying read. Its world-building and dystopian future plus the intricate details of putting all the three characters together from little events popping up in their passing at the beginning to having the three characters’ path intersect was done really well. Despite its little moments, its still well-executed in the scope of the story that it wants to tell.

Score: 4.5/5

Check out my review of Terry Tyler’s other book, Hope HERE.