Red Ribbons by Louise Phillips

Its been a few weeks since a book review but I’ve taken some time to get back into a new rhythm. Its still a work in progress.  The good news is that I’m back to reading and I have book reviews for the next few weeks. I’m pretty happy about that. There is naturally no feeling better than sitting next to the pool under the sun and reading. That is one of the best feelings of summer. I’m still diving into the unread books on my Kindle so next up is a mystery thriller called Red Ribbons by Louise Phillips. I know nothing about this and have no expectations, which is probably the best way to start a book.

Let’s check it out! 🙂

Red Ribbons
by Louise Phillips

Red Ribbons

 A SERIAL KILLER. A missing schoolgirl is found buried in the Dublin Mountains, hands clasped together in prayer, two red ribbons in her hair. Twenty-four hours later, a second schoolgirl is found in a shallow grave – her body identically arranged. A hunt for the killer is on.
THE CRIMINAL PSYCHOLOGIST. The police call in profiler Dr Kate Pearson to get inside the mind of the murderer before he strikes again. But the more Kate discovers about the killings, the more it all feels terrifyingly familiar.
THE ACCUSED WOMAN. As the pressure to find the killer intensifies, there’s one vital connection to be made – Ellie Brady, a mother institutionalised fifteen years earlier for the murder of her daughter Amy. She stopped talking when everyone stopped listening.
What connects the death of Amy Brady to the murdered schoolgirls? As Kate Pearson begins to unravel the truth, danger is closer than she knows… The bad man is everywhere. Can you see him? – Goodreads

Red Ribbons was a downright surprise. While at part the story dragged on, the overall story had so many tense and chilling moments. Sitting in the mind of the serial killer, the criminal psychologist and an accused woman that everyone thinks is crazy has a whole new level of contrast in characters. In the beginning, its hard to determine what everyone is doing. You might not even know what the end goal of anyone is here. Thing is, these are all flawed beings and they have their own issues. As we peek into their lives and the case opens up and more information is discovered, the tone and effectiveness of the story really grabs hold. Its hard to fathom actually experiencing a murder like this one. Thing is, what everything means never becomes apparent until the last few chapters. It doesn’t have anything to do with the manipulation of surprises and twists like a lot of thrillers do. There is a care in building up so that the we start understanding and developing especially the serial killer and criminal psychologist.

I can’t say that there isn’t a bias on my part. I do love criminal psychology a lot. However, its the feeling of learning about the deep complex psychological aspects that us as humans have. The scariest thing in this world to me (even above my immense fear of ghosts) is the twisted human nature. Its why this intrigues me so much.  This is the true winner of Red Ribbons.  Its not hard to believe that the characters in Red Ribbons could exist in our world. They are made to be human as well as their reactions and their lives. Kate, the criminal psychologist, is accomplished and smart. She notices and captures the little details that others have neglected. However, despite all these abilities, it strengthens the fact that your pros professionally may be your downfall in your personal life and her life is fractured. She struggles to find a balance just like a normal everyday person (at least I can feel for her). Even Ellie, the accused woman has a strong voice. Her loss, her flaws, her self-blame and her hopelessness is actually a little heartbreaking to read. The scariest character has to be the serial killer. The twist is that we as the reader, know who he is the whole time. Not by name or specific character but he drops hints on himself and we start wondering who this person doing the narrative is and we also know his personality traits. The piece of the puzzle that we learn is his history and what triggered him to murder.

Red Ribbons is a great find and a well-paced read. There is no point to dive further into details because that just kills a thriller. The best way is to walk into this not knowing too much and deciphering for yourself. I promise you, I just scratched the surface. There is still so much to unveil. I urge you to give it a chance if you like mystery thrillers or criminal psychology investigations.

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